GL-14 images

Dinghies, day sailers, world cruisers. Many small sailboats make ideal rowboats or low-speed power boats.

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mpark
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Post by mpark » Tue Oct 21, 2008 10:01 am

I ran the test twice, once without the sails and once with. Without the sails, my 12 year old daughter was able to right it. With the sails she could not, but I could fairly easily. I did not uncleat the jib, but did the mainsail so I would have the halyard to pull when righting. Uncleating the jig probably would have made it easier right when I had the jib up. I should have thought about that, but it was easy enough to right without doing that.

She sails fairly well. I’ve had her out three times now, and I’m still learning how to sail myself. It’s a bit more bow heavy than I expected, but I’m sailing alone. I expect when I get the family in, it will smooth out a bit with more wait in the stern (They refuse to go out until I can sail with confidence). Also the helm weathers fairly strongly with wind gusts (not necessarly a bad thing). Also, I got her up on her side so that water came up on the side deck once (but not in the boat) kinda like the second image on http://webpages.charter.net/tspark/gl-14G.htm, which was a bit scary. However, I’m learning how to trim the main and maneuver to keep that from happening. I’m also working on preventing those flying booms by not running to far down wind on days when the winds are shifting. I’m not embarrassed to say that I like to chicken jibe!

I am able to use both sails and steer fairly easily by myself. From time to time, the jib sheets will get tangled in the cleats on the mast for the halyards when coming about, so I may need to move them. I’ve rigged up a bungee cord so I can keep the rudder straight while I clear the jib sheets.

Right now, I’ve got a small leak around the centerboard pin. I’ve had to drill a couple of holes in the trunk base (the ¾” board around the bottom) so I can inject some glue in around the ¼ plywood. Hopefully I’ll get that patched up this week and get some more wind this weekend. It’s starting to get to cold to go out and soon and I doubt I’ll feel like getting in the water to trailer the boat until spring.

I wish the “Second Annual Gathering of boat builders” was not 8 hours away, I’d like to go, maybe I can make another one. If we had not been traveling the last several weekends, then I expect I could go, but the timing just isn’t working out this time.

Since I'm currently sailing by myself, that's why there are no pictures of the boat sailing. I'm keep trying to remedy that, and hopefully I can get some images posted of me on the lake soon. I've also have to come up with a name for her. I've then thinking about "Ark Park" but I'm not sure about that.

-Mark Park

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mpark
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Post by mpark » Mon Nov 03, 2008 11:01 am

I finally have some images of us out sailing the finished GL-14. They are here: http://webpages.charter.net/tspark/gl-14H.htm and one as a background here http://webpages.charter.net/tspark/gl-14.htm :D :D :D

Don't I look cool in my shades! :lol:

upspirate

Post by upspirate » Mon Nov 03, 2008 2:37 pm

Great pics Mark.

I saw an unfinished one at the Gathering,it's a great looking boat design and you did a wonderful job on yours!

Warren

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BruceDow
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Post by BruceDow » Mon Nov 03, 2008 7:18 pm

Congratulations. That is a beautiful boat. You deserve to be proud!
Bruce.

~~ Do what you love, and love what you do. ~~
~~ To me - only my boat is not yet perfect. Everybody else's is to be admired for I know the path they have walked (Dave Lott, 2010) ~~
Dow's Monaco Project

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Bill Edmundson
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Post by Bill Edmundson » Mon Nov 03, 2008 7:47 pm

:)

That is all I can say :!:

Bill
Mini -Tug, KH Tahoe 19 & Bartender 24 - There can be no miracle recoveries without first screwing up.
Tahoe 19 Build

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Rational Root
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Fantastic....

Post by Rational Root » Tue Nov 04, 2008 1:55 am

Fantastic....

It looks great. Really Great.

Seeing those pictures is a real help in motivating me to get mine finished.

D
Hey! I built a boat ! No Really, I did !
http://davesboat.blogspot.com/

kcooper
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Post by kcooper » Fri Nov 14, 2008 2:40 pm

Thanks for the great photos of your build and sailing. I'm building a Glen-L 14 myself and am at the point of painting the deck. Mine will be for granddaughters!

Your observation about the boat seeming heavy at the bow while sailing may be corrected by raking your mast aft some. This should bring the center of effort on the sails back as well. As I recall, the plans call for a rake of 4 inches over the length of the mast.

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razopp
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Post by razopp » Fri Nov 14, 2008 3:13 pm

Kcooper...

You may want to post this suggestion in Mark's earlier post regarding Mast Rake. It would certainly be appreciated by anyone reading the post later.

Robert

Mark...love the pictures. Keep them coming.

PapaDon
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Knock down---well, kind of.

Post by PapaDon » Fri Jan 09, 2009 5:46 pm

Mark, I loved seeing you testing like that. With small children aboard you have more reason than most for knowing what the boat will, or will not do. Your 3rd photo sends chills down my spine!
I built the Glenn-L 12 but they are similar in that they both have forward and side decking. Therefore, I had an experience you may like to hear about.
I was sailing along with my 200lb ballast (butt) planted firmly on the starboard side decking. Nice breeze, rail down occasionally. Then IT happened.
I was hit by a gust. ( I say 'gust' but it lasted 15 minutes at least.) In the next one second a whole lot of things happened.
I found myself standing upright on the port side (inside of course), my back firmly against the starboard decking, trying to get my weight back---but I don't bend that way. I am focused on my feet and watching a good 4" of water pour over the coaming and into the boat. At that moment I thought "well, that's it! I'm going swimming."
My immediate response had been to let go the tiller and main sheet and the boat was turning violently into the wind.
Another second goes by and I find myself sitting on the bottom of the boat, heart pounding, adrenaline flowing, and being rained on by the mainsail. I looked up and was studying the sail. I have a gauge which uses a flag on a pole and judging wind speeds from that. The sails were flat out with hardly a flap in them. Gauge says 39mph to do that. I don't know how accurate this is....but I doubt it not for a minute.
End of story is, after 'some time', I wrestled down the sails, started the outboard, and called it a day.
It seems to me that even on its side, the boat was still a boat. It WANTED to come UP. I felt it in my feet, a 'surge'. Mind you, it had to 'lift' my 200lbs., plus the outboard mounted on that side, 35lbs. + gas, and all the loose stuff which had shifted to that side, call it 15lbs. Quite a feat!
This is not an experience I want to repeat but I'm happy to have had it. It taught me something. I feel a lot better KNOWING how the boat reacts under those conditions.
My hope is, in posting this, you'll be a little more comfortable out there with your family. We both know our boats ARE NOT going to sink like rocks----no matter what. BTW: beautiful work! Enjoy!
If God had intended for us to have fibreglass boats, we would have fibreglass trees.

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mpark
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Post by mpark » Tue Jan 20, 2009 9:21 am

Wow, that is does sound scary. I’ve had gusts start to lay the boat over, but not to the point of taking on water… yet. If you think about a 20’ mast the leverage the sail has makes turning several hundred pounds very easy. It is nice to know that these boats are designed to want to stay upright!

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Bill Edmundson
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Post by Bill Edmundson » Tue Jan 20, 2009 9:54 am

When a sailboat rounds up it can be a real gut check. Normally the center of effort (force on the sail) is pretty much over the CG of the boat. You correct the miss alignment with thje rudder.

As the boat heals more and more The CE gets way out of alignment. That moment arm makes the boat turn regardless of what you can do. When you released the rudder the sails had there way. Scary!

Its like driving fast around a curve that is banked the wrong way.

Bill
Mini -Tug, KH Tahoe 19 & Bartender 24 - There can be no miracle recoveries without first screwing up.
Tahoe 19 Build

upspirate

Post by upspirate » Tue Jan 20, 2009 4:43 pm

Only goes to illustrate that you need to hold the main sheet on small boats in heavy conditions rather than cleating it off even in a jam or clam cleat!! :wink: :shock: :roll:

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