Electric cooking.

Wiring your boat, How to Wire Lights/Accessories, All things electrical other than actually powering your boat by electric motors.

Moderator: Bill Edmundson

Ozzieboat
Posts: 224
Joined: Sun Jun 07, 2009 4:40 am
Location: Logan, Queensland, Australia

Re: Electric cooking.

Postby Ozzieboat » Tue Aug 18, 2015 4:06 am

Ray
It would appear the recall covered all brands of these cookers in OZ as the same unit wore many brand names. None of these cookers are available now in camping shops in Australia, but there are heaps of propane cans for sale. The problem as stated is that the certifiers did not properly conduct all the required test for certification although they approved them regardless. A couple of explosions drew the crabs. Consensus is that the problem lies with some users placing a too big a pot on the unit and the heat was being locked in. I have kept mine, but for outdoor use only.
By the way I really enjoyed your travelogues that were published in the old GL News Letter. Any chance of some more with SeaQuinn?
Sorry all for my deviation from the original thread.
ozzieboat

User avatar
kens
Posts: 4441
Joined: Wed Nov 12, 2003 5:25 pm
Location: Coastal Georgia

Re: Electric cooking.

Postby kens » Tue Aug 18, 2015 8:43 am

A great many of the trawlers and sailboats doing the Bahamas crossings, have a grill hanging over the side rail.
Most are the little propane bottle grills, and some are actually charcoal, and the coals/ash fall overboard.
Oak is over rated, everything about it takes extra time; then it warps, splits or checks !!! :roll:

User avatar
kens
Posts: 4441
Joined: Wed Nov 12, 2003 5:25 pm
Location: Coastal Georgia

Re: Electric cooking.

Postby kens » Tue Aug 18, 2015 9:08 am

Try this link, they seem to have a good selection of cooking options.
http://www.defender.com/category.jsp?pa ... id=2276218

I like the idea of 2 (two) fishing rod holders on the gunnel or transom. 1 rod holder can hold the grill overboard, and the other can hold a 'fillet table'. Fillet table can be used as a Chef prep station. All the scraps/drippings go overboard, and if the grill (heaven forbid) caught a grease fire the whole thing could be chucked overboard.
Oak is over rated, everything about it takes extra time; then it warps, splits or checks !!! :roll:

User avatar
chugalug
Posts: 1061
Joined: Sat Nov 29, 2014 5:01 pm
Location: top of mn.

Re: Electric cooking.

Postby chugalug » Wed Aug 19, 2015 6:17 am

:D Still thinking about putting comb fillet table and prep station over back of "Chug-a-Lug" .would be on top of motorwell.And offset mount for grill so could rotate in for storage between meals.Don't think Bill's idea of hopping from one resturante to another resturantee will work up here(not too many resturantee's around :lol: )
Working on regular-sized Bo-Jest


"If it's not crooked,It's not mine

User avatar
chugalug
Posts: 1061
Joined: Sat Nov 29, 2014 5:01 pm
Location: top of mn.

Re: Electric cooking.

Postby chugalug » Sat Oct 10, 2015 10:34 pm

:D maybe a charcoal grill would be better or does it get too hot for the railing on back.I know on some of the bigger diesel boats,they have wood stoves.
Working on regular-sized Bo-Jest


"If it's not crooked,It's not mine

User avatar
Locutus
Posts: 78
Joined: Thu Feb 26, 2015 9:23 am

Re: Electric cooking.

Postby Locutus » Mon Oct 12, 2015 8:11 am

How about an induction cooktop, maybe combined with a microwave oven? They use much less electricity than a conventional electric cooktop, the surface remains cool to the touch, and it won't heat up your cabin on a warm day. You'll still need sufficient capacity (about 1500 to 1800 watts per burner) for the current draw but it will heat up your food faster than a conventional cooktop, thereby reducing electricity consumption. You'll need special cookware as well--no aluminum. If a magnet will adhere to the bottom of your pan, you're good to go.

You'd need either a generator or a sizable battery bank and solar panel array to power one of these units. Probably at least 4 Trojan T-105 golf cart batteries or similar, and as much as 600 watts of solar panels, plus an inverter. So not a cheap way to go by any means, even though you could probably pick up a couple of single burners for around 50 bucks each. It's the supporting electrical system that costs the big bucks.

I've seen single units at Costco occasionally for around 50 bucks each. Here are some online examples:

http://www.amazon.com/Inducto-A79-Profe ... p+portable

http://www.amazon.com/Waring-ICT400-Dou ... p+portable

If it wasn't for the cost I'd go the induction route myself. But I'm equally attracted to the butane canister stoves, which are cheap and can be stored--stove and all--outside in the propane locker. You can even operate them on the cockpit benches if you like on a warm day. Very simple and effective way to go. Use a pressure cooker for baking.

User avatar
Dave Grason
Posts: 3762
Joined: Wed Dec 24, 2003 5:19 am
Location: Nashville, Tn.

Re: Electric cooking.

Postby Dave Grason » Mon Oct 12, 2015 12:45 pm

At home, the induction route is GREAT!! We have a unit we bought from Amazon and we LOVE it! But of course, you are correct that it would be difficult to use it in a primitive setting.
Isn't it amazing!! The person that never has the fortitude to pursue his own dreams, will be the first to try and discourage you from pursuing yours.

Casiopea
Posts: 2
Joined: Mon Jul 18, 2016 1:28 am

Re: Electric cooking.

Postby Casiopea » Mon Jul 18, 2016 1:48 am

I threw the gas out of my boat when I bought it 2+ years ago.
I have a microwave/grill on board and a mobile twin electric hob (it stows away when not in use). With the engine running (contributing over 50A) the 2kW inverter will run everything (crank and liesure kept separate - remember!) The key to everything though is a 2kW remote control generator in the rear rope locker and triple redundancy for the electrical system:

Shore power is king - automatically switches the generator and inverter out.
Generator is next - switches the inverter out.
Inverter is last but least - takes precedence over the 12V supply to the fridge.

Works a treat.

Lecky toaster.
Lecky kettle.
Lecky twin hotplate.
Lecky micro/grill.
Lecky fridge (Waeco - simply the best (12V/220V)

User avatar
chugalug
Posts: 1061
Joined: Sat Nov 29, 2014 5:01 pm
Location: top of mn.

Re: Electric cooking.

Postby chugalug » Sat Dec 10, 2016 9:58 am

:D was reading all the articles in "the boat galley" and came across Cobb kitchen in a box fired by charcoal-think I'll try that next summer when i get Chug done and out in the water. :D
Working on regular-sized Bo-Jest


"If it's not crooked,It's not mine

User avatar
hoodman
Posts: 1069
Joined: Thu Nov 10, 2011 8:48 am
Location: Lafayette, IN

Re: Electric cooking.

Postby hoodman » Sat Dec 10, 2016 11:41 am

What about a Coleman dual fuel camp stove. They can run on unleaded gasoline which you will be carrying anyway.

User avatar
chugalug
Posts: 1061
Joined: Sat Nov 29, 2014 5:01 pm
Location: top of mn.

Re: Electric cooking.

Postby chugalug » Sat Dec 10, 2016 12:11 pm

:D According to the you-tube video,the bottom of the cooker stays cool even while in use.uses charcoal briquettes.can even sit on side of boat but probably try to make holder for it on stern area.or could sit on table inside pilothouse. :D and is expandable to use as smoker.
Working on regular-sized Bo-Jest


"If it's not crooked,It's not mine

User avatar
Bill Edmundson
Posts: 10431
Joined: Wed Nov 23, 2005 6:45 am
Location: Birmingham, AL, USA
Contact:

Re: Electric cooking.

Postby Bill Edmundson » Sat Dec 10, 2016 12:52 pm

Get a carbon monoxide detector. Not a bad idea for any boat with a cabin.

Bill
Mini -Tug, KH Tahoe 19 & Bartender 24 - There can be no miracle recoveries without first screwing up.
Tahoe 19 Build

User avatar
hoodman
Posts: 1069
Joined: Thu Nov 10, 2011 8:48 am
Location: Lafayette, IN

Re: Electric cooking.

Postby hoodman » Sat Dec 10, 2016 1:26 pm

Charcoal does seem on the surface like a bad idea on a boat but the upside is not having to worry about where you store the fuel! Use a chimney starter and you don't even have to carry lighter fluid.

User avatar
chugalug
Posts: 1061
Joined: Sat Nov 29, 2014 5:01 pm
Location: top of mn.

Re: Electric cooking.

Postby chugalug » Sat Dec 10, 2016 1:49 pm

:roll: I know an open flame near possible gas fumes has me worried,whether its propane,gas or charcoal.Bill-that detector sounds logical as well as bilge fume detector.
Working on regular-sized Bo-Jest


"If it's not crooked,It's not mine


Return to “Electric Power & Systems”

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 2 guests