Repairs

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Brian
Posts: 173
Joined: Mon Feb 18, 2013 10:06 pm
Location: Hawaii

Repairs

Postby Brian » Mon Feb 05, 2018 3:17 pm

After sanding my Sapele Mahogany to a fairtheewell, We covered it with epoxy fiberglass. It all went well. However, after a few months, when I was ready to clear coat over it, I noticed a few places where you could see the cloth pattern. The standard for determining whether something is objectionable prior to clear coat seems to be to wet it down with lacquer thinner or whatever. If it looks ok while it is wet, it won't show after clear coat. Unfortunately, there were some vertical streaks of this weave showing right on the top of the barrel back, about an inch wide and extending down about a foot. They did not totally disappear with the wet test, so I decided to deal with them. After getting a lot of advice from surfboard makers (who sometimes do wood), I sanded the spots down by hand, primed with epoxy, sanded some more, laid in some teeny 2oz cloth pieces, sanded some more, put down some more epoxy, and sanded some more. Now the surface there is nice and flat to the hand, and when I wipe it with thinner, it almost disappears, but not quite. So my question is, how noticeable/relevant is something really minor in a really visible spot going to be? I'm not sending photos, because it's that hard to see. And it's probably one of those "only I will know" spots. But I have spent almost 5 years on this, and I'd like it to be perfect, if possible. Has anyone had experience with such repairs? Is this spot method inadvisable? I have thought that maybe I need to machine sand off all the glass in a large area around the rear quarter, like 2'X2' and lay in new class. Obviously a huge job, but maybe that's what people do.

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Bill Edmundson
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Re: Repairs

Postby Bill Edmundson » Mon Feb 05, 2018 3:45 pm

Brian

Bump the throttle a little more! Nobody will notice it!

Bill
Mini -Tug, KH Tahoe 19 & Bartender 24 - There can be no miracle recoveries without first screwing up.
Tahoe 19 Build

PeterG
Posts: 381
Joined: Mon Dec 03, 2007 7:08 am
Location: Connecticut

Re: Repairs

Postby PeterG » Mon Feb 05, 2018 9:12 pm

Should not be a problem from the sounds of it... Even the pros have had issues. I once saw a brand new cold molded replica Chris Craft runabout that had been fiberglassed up to the deck, finished with a beautiful stain and gloss. But when I got real close in direct, noontime, summer sunlight I saw a faint weave pattern. Never would see it otherwise, just when really close in bright light and probably only because the gloss was deep and the light was "bent" by the weave. Dockside, four feet away, you'd never see it.
Murphy's Law: Anything that can go wrong, will go wrong.
Griffin's Law: Murphy was an optimist.

Brian
Posts: 173
Joined: Mon Feb 18, 2013 10:06 pm
Location: Hawaii

Re: Repairs

Postby Brian » Tue Feb 06, 2018 1:05 am

Thanks, Peter. That's encouraging. It's such a big surface, and the clear coat has to be done all at once (per side), so I'm bringing in a friend who is a pro car painter to help. One thing I think I'll do is clear coat the section on the barrel back myself in advance. Can't hurt, and then I will see what it really looks like. Unfortunately, the boat is in a shed and can't be moved out into the sun.


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