Tranferring plans to wood

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Otter
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Tranferring plans to wood

Post by Otter » Wed Feb 13, 2019 8:00 pm

I feel a little silly for asking this (as tracing seems like an exercise that any 2nd grader should have mastered) but have any of you had difficulties with transferring your plans to your layout board/plywood/wood? What at first seemed simple (place transfer paper under plan, pin plan to wood, begin drawing over line w/pencil) became increasingly frustrating when 1) the plans bunched up (particularly since mine came folded); 2) when smoothing plan over wood, paper began shifting and ripping through tacks; 3) more tacks seemed to provide more places for the paper to tear as I am tracing; 4) the 7 foot long plan sheet catches a corner of my workbench, and further pulls things off kilter; 4) just when I think I have everything secure, and everything traced out, I remove the plan and transfer paper, only to see that the two halves of my transom don't line up (i.e. something slipped while tracing one or both sides).

Have any of you had similar frustrations? Any tips for making this process easier/faster/less likely to be fouled up (particularly those of you who have 7 to 8 foot long plans to work with)? One thing I did note that it became somewhat easier when I made my sighting holes larger (I followed the advise of one forum post I saw which suggested using an exacto knife around a penny).
CHris
Chris Otterness
Whitewater 16, Guillemot

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Roberta
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Re: Tranferring plans to wood

Post by Roberta » Thu Feb 14, 2019 6:40 am

With larger pattern sheets, it does become a little more challenging. I have an 4x8 foot table I work off of that helps. I also take the patterns to a blueprint shop to copy and mirror the patterns so it is easier to make the full size pieces.. I also lay a thin sheet of MFD board on the table so I can draw the frames on it in full size to make sure they are correctly assembled. Reinforce any pin holes used to anchor the patterns to either the table or wood being cut. Make sure you establish the centerline accurately so when you flip half patterns, things line up properly. I use a pin to transfer the pattern to wood instead of transfer paper. Then pin holes are connected with pencil lines. The plans for the Torpedo came rolled. It surprises me that yours were folded.
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Otter
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Re: Tranferring plans to wood

Post by Otter » Thu Feb 14, 2019 8:04 pm

Roberta
thanks for the tips. I will try them all, particularly reinforcing the pin holes. I also saw another recent post about ironing the folder plans...i may try that.
Chris
Chris Otterness
Whitewater 16, Guillemot

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sproggy
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Re: Tranferring plans to wood

Post by sproggy » Mon Feb 18, 2019 9:02 am

I tried ironing my plans - it made little difference. I held the plans down with weights which avoids the risk of the plans tearing away from pins while still allowing some tension to keep them flat. And I used a tracing wheel (like this: https://www.amazon.co.uk/dp/B0028LAX2O/ ... 31_TE_dp_2) rather than a pencil as that rolls over the surface of the plans instead of pushing them like a pencil does. Even so, you still have to lift off occasionally to avoid bunching of the plan ahead of the pressure point.

+1 on getting the centerline spot on - get that wrong and you're in trouble.

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chugalug
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Re: Tranferring plans to wood

Post by chugalug » Mon Feb 18, 2019 10:05 am

I used a thin piece of plexi-glass.using sharpie ,drew on plex. and cut out using bandsaw.I started with the biggest piece and kept using until all were transfered to wood.(I didn't have lots of patterns left)just lots of chopped up plex.Some of the frames were 1 side from center so just flip plex over for other side and draw around . :D If you try the plex. recommend you sand edges of plex to get burr off.
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PeterG
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Re: Tranferring plans to wood

Post by PeterG » Mon Feb 18, 2019 2:42 pm

Thin clear plastic is a great way to do it. I saw an episode of American Craftsman years ago that showed Van Dam boats designing and building a custom mahogany inboard. They showed the builder using the plastic and sharpie method for templating frame pieces. He cut out the pieces from the plastic and drew around them to make the layout. Worked great. If you are making duplicates, trace out one piece and tack or tape a second piece of stock under it, cut and prep both at once.
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Mark-NJ
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Re: Tranferring plans to wood

Post by Mark-NJ » Wed Feb 27, 2019 6:55 pm

By no means am I saying that what I did is "right" or "better"....just that it worked for me.

First, I started with carbon paper & making lines method. What a mess. I abandoned that immediately.

Then I started to poke with pins. Nope.

So I bought a roll of tracing paper, and laid it over my plans and traced the lines. I cut these tracings out "proud" of the lines, then mixed up Elmer's white glue & water to make a thin sloppy glue-water mix. I "painted" my wood with this glue, then glued my tracings directly to the wood...

Image

Then it was an easy matter of sawing on the lines:

Image

Easily done! Dimensionally correct! And the glued-on paper sands right off.

Image

Can't stress it enough: I'm not claiming this is "how to". But it worked better for me than the other ways.

PeterG
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Re: Tranferring plans to wood

Post by PeterG » Thu Feb 28, 2019 6:29 am

Tracing paper! Really clever! Works too if you want to make thin ply or hardboard templates for making the piece parts. Good to hear from you Mark!
Murphy's Law: Anything that can go wrong, will go wrong.
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Jimbob
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Re: Tranferring plans to wood

Post by Jimbob » Thu Feb 28, 2019 4:25 pm

This is what I did.

I was afraid of screwing up on the expensive hardwood, so I first made patterns out of 1/2" MDF. (I used 1/2" MDF so later the router bit bearing would have plenty of surface to ride on). I cut the MDF down into pieces that were close to the size that I need for each frame. I then put Glen L carbon paper over the MDF and positioned the plans over the MDF piece. I found that a ball point pen worked great for tracing over the plan lines without tearing them or moving them around like a pencil might. I also cut small "peep holes" in the plans with a hobby knife for easy alignment. I used push pins into the MDF to hold everything in place (the pins go into the MDF easily.) Once I had my MDF marked, I took it to the bandsaw and cut along the lines. Next I used a patternmaker's rasp and sanding to do the final shaping of the MDF (a spindle sander will work great for this). After all of that, I laid that piece of the MDF back on top of the plans to check for a perfect copy. I only needed to cut one pattern because the frames are mirror image.

After all of the pattern making, I traced the patterns onto the hardwood, and cut maybe a 1/16" larger outside of the line. I then used double sided carpet tape to stick the pattern to the hardwood. The final step was to use a flush trim router bit to do the final trim to match the pattern. The pattern was then flipped over for making the opposite side of the frame.

Hope all of this detail helps.

Jim
Jim Neeley
Building a Barrelback in Sacramento, CA
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