Wood For Motor Stringers

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Dave Grason
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Joined: Wed Dec 24, 2003 5:19 am
Location: Lake Barkley, KY

Wood For Motor Stringers

Post by Dave Grason »

I've been out shopping for wood, today. As I've stated before, white oak is very plentiful in my area. However, I'm still having a difficult time finding 8/4x6"x13' quarter sawn that's straight enough to serve as my motor stringers. The problem is that yards are selling this stuff for so many applications that do not call for anything this long and as a result, the mills are cutting it shorter.

My question is: "Can I epoxy laminate two peices of 4/4x6 and still have the sufficient strength? Also, I'm finding that the mills do not want to do very much quarter sawing because they lose a lot of wood that they otherwise would be able to sell.

Any ideas anyone?
Isn't it amazing!! The person that never has the fortitude to pursue his own dreams, will be the first to try and discourage you from pursuing yours.

Barry
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Location: Bellflower, CA

Post by Barry »

With the proper glue, a laminated piece is probably stronger, depending how the grain is oriented.

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Dave Grason
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Location: Lake Barkley, KY

Post by Dave Grason »

So is the epoxy the correct glue? And how should I orient the grain?

Also, the peices I've seen so far are not perfectly straight. They're really close, but not quite. If there is a little run-out can I correct that later? How critical is this?
Isn't it amazing!! The person that never has the fortitude to pursue his own dreams, will be the first to try and discourage you from pursuing yours.

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kens
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Location: Coastal Georgia

Post by kens »

West System does recommend to make laminations for structural members. They say to orient the grain randomly. That is, do not simply resaw the stock, then laminate it back together. They indicate that the more laminations the better. But the more glue lines you have the more structural it is, but it gets heavyier with the more glue lines, and more work/cost to build it all up.
Also, different types of woods can be laminated into the layers to get different properties in the laminate. The engineering in this area is a wide open field to experiment with.

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