How do you put the oak stripes in the mohog?

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Dave Beem
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Joined: Tue Dec 23, 2003 7:01 am
Location: Spokane WA

How do you put the oak stripes in the mohog?

Post by Dave Beem »

ok this may sound a bit stuped! I have seen alot of boats with this stripes of maybe oak in the mohog plywood? OK I am an electronics tech not a big wood working type but In plywood how do you put these strips of white wood in there?? are these guyes wood masters? or can a simple guy like me do this with basic shop tools? hey this looks so great I want to do this to my boat but have no clue! except routering it out and inlaying it? please help ?
Dave

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Dave Grason
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Post by Dave Grason »

Ok, first of all, I haven't done this myself personally. But with my new upcoming project, I plan on getting the nostalgic "feature" lines in the mahogany as well. To me, it's just not quite "right" without these lines. But I've been studying on this for almost 2 decades and I feel totally confident in my ability to do this.

I have a coffee table book telling the story of Chris Craft. In the old days, they used to use mahogany planking for the decks. The planks would be 3/4 of an inch thick or more. Then each board had a dado cut in it to one side that would later be filled with caulk. That's one way of doing it.

Nowdays with the advent of epoxy there's a much better way and I'll take the example of my Mist Miss. According to the plans, I will need to use 3/8" plywood decking. Once I have that down, I'll cover it in mahogany strips of the correct width (actually I may try lyptus because it's SO gorgeous) leaving 1/4 gap between the boards that will be filled later. The strips of wood will be 2" wide and 1/4" thick. The covering boards are the boards that run along the sheer and mine will be wider. But I don't know how much wider until I have the boat flipped and ready. I'll take the measurements then.

So far, there seem to be 2 schools of thought on how to fill the gaps.

Graham Knight is using strips of a really light colored wood. It looks like a very easy solution and from what I can see on his webpics, it looks great. I haven't found the type of wood he's using here in the states but I don't know why maple wouldn't work really well.

Mark Bronkalla used tinted epoxy for his feature lines. It's simply the same epoxy as is used to seal the wood but it has had a coloring agent mixed in. (that is if I'm understanding the process correctly) It appears to me that using this method will be somewhat more problematic that Graham's method, however, I think this is the way I'm going to go on my boat because I think it's more "correct." Bronk did a wonderful job documenting his build and I really learned a great deal by repeatedlly studying his photos and reading and then rereading the text. As a side note, Bronk routed the plywood back away from the sheer on his boat, so that he could have the covering board meet the sides of the boat. That way, there would be no plywood showing that would later have to be covered with a rub rail or something.

Go to Bronk's site and give it a look if you haven't already found it. www.bronkalla.com

Also, Graham has posted pics of his build on Yahoo, too. But I can't find it. I know Graham will see this and point you in the right direction. He reads every post.

What ever you decide to do, DO NOT try to obtain the look using anything from your neighborhood paint store. I saw a guy that tried tubes of caulk here locally and it looked like sh...... well it looked REALLY BAD!
Isn't it amazing!! The person that never has the fortitude to pursue his own dreams, will be the first to try and discourage you from pursuing yours.

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Graham Knight
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Post by Graham Knight »

I suspect what you are looking at is not wood striping in the ply, but Mahogany veneer planks glued on top of the ply with pale strips in between, that's how I did mine.
Take a look at this page of Mark Bronkalla's website
http://www.bronkalla.com/decking_2.htm and the next page to see exactly how it's done. The only difference between his method and mine is that he did the pale caulking strips in coloured epoxy, while I did mine with wood, both methods are quite easy to do.
Graham in Shepperton, England

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Dave Grason
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Post by Dave Grason »

See Dave, I told you Graham would read your post. :D
Isn't it amazing!! The person that never has the fortitude to pursue his own dreams, will be the first to try and discourage you from pursuing yours.

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Graham Knight
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Post by Graham Knight »

Well as Dave has prompted me, here's the LINK to my decking photos.
You can see how the planking (1/8" thick in this case) is laid with a gap between each pair of planks, then a strip of paler wood is glued into the gap and the whole lot sanded smooth and varnished.
Graham in Shepperton, England

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TerryMc

Good Stuff - but how did you cut the curved parts?

Post by TerryMc »

Graham,
This was a good post, I was about to aske the same question - but maybe a little more baisc. I'm pretty good with a table saw (I think I can consistently cut to 1/32 inch - that's my self imposed tolerance on my Squirt), but I'm nowhere close to that good on curves - I really strugged getting my stem cut right. How did you cut the edge boards, and join into the straight deck boards, and hold that 1/4 close enough?
TRM

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DavidMcA
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Post by DavidMcA »

I'd also like to know that!!
I've seen it done 2 ways....one is to glue down the finishing boards first, then cut the inner curve using a router. Then the straight planks would have to be cut separately to fit.
The other way I saw it done was to lay the oversized planks in position on the hull, then lay the finishing board on top of the planks and draw along the curve with a pencil.
When I get round to doing mine, I think I will do it the first way...unless Graham tells us an even better way.....
:)

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Graham Knight
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Post by Graham Knight »

Well the way I did it was to make the finishing boards first, I cut the outer edge curve first by laying them on the deck and marking from underneath with a pencil, cut that and temporarily fitted them in place with masking tape, starting at the stem and working back, adjusting the joins slightly as neccessary. BTW, if you use 3mm (1/8") veneer as I did you can cut it easily with a sharp knife, this means you can do most of it in situ which makes the fitting much easier, you just need the knife and a sanding block.
Once I was happy with the fit I marked the inner curve using a simple guage, a block of wood with a pencil taped to it at one end, and another block glued at the other end to follow the outer edge. The finishing boards from the stem as far back as the dashboard are a constant width, then they get wider towards the transom, I marked that bit using a batten and following the shape of the cockpit and the hatch.
Then I cut the inner curve (with the knife) and glued the boards in place a pair (L&R) at a time working back from the stem. If you do use the thinner veneer and cut it with a knife, you must always cut "away" from the grain, otherwise the blade will start to follow the grain.
Next I fitted the wide central kingplank, and then the narrower planks two at a time either side, gluing them in place as I went along (don't try to glue them all at once at the end, I guarantee they won't fit properly if you do!) the long ones near the centre line are easy to fit as the ends are almost a straight cut, as you get further out the cut gets longer and more curved and requires more patience to get it right. Leave them over length at the back, then if you screw it up you get another go at it with the same plank, or you can use it elsewhere for one of the shorter pieces.
Cut plenty of small spacer blocks and use them to ensure the gap is a constant width.
That's about it really, I may have made it sound simple but it really isn't very difficult, you just need a bit of patience especially with those outer planks which take a little while to get right. You could always cut a card template for those if you wanted then transfer the shape to the wood, but you'll still have to trim that slightly for a final fit so it's probably just making more work, it may be worth it for the practice though if you don't feel confident.
Graham in Shepperton, England

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Dave Beem
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Location: Spokane WA

Wood Strips

Post by Dave Beem »

Hey Thank you Graham, I know I caused a few replys :) but still one more question? you said you used caulk? but it looks like it is strips? The only stuff I have seen comes in a tube? ( I have never seen anyother before) Oh I seen you photos and you did a fantastic job on the boat. agine Thank you for you time in this question of mine.

Dave

P.S. Dave thank you you for your input also every bit sure helps.

Dave Beem
Posts: 41
Joined: Tue Dec 23, 2003 7:01 am
Location: Spokane WA

Wood strips

Post by Dave Beem »

Sorry Graham I misread your reply you did use wood strips. and what type of glue? because of discoloration to the strips white glue?

TY
Dave

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Graham Knight
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Re: Wood strips

Post by Graham Knight »

Dave Beem wrote:Sorry Graham I misread your reply you did use wood strips. and what type of glue?
All of the decking, "caulking" strips as well, was done with polyurethane adhesive, a product available here in Europe called Balcotan. See HERE for details.
It's like the well known Gorilla Glue etc..., very strong and 100%waterproof, but it doesn't foam as much as GG which makes it much easier to use, it's specially formulated for boatbuilding. I don't know if there's an equivalent in the US, but if you can find one I can thoroughly recommend it for this type of work.
Graham in Shepperton, England

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Cap'n Kirk
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Thanks!

Post by Cap'n Kirk »

This is excellent information, I too was having some questions as to how to tackle this part of my construction.

Kirk

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