Wet Plywood Stitch and Glue Hull - will it dry?

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Reggie
Posts: 7
Joined: Sun Dec 03, 2017 8:02 am

Wet Plywood Stitch and Glue Hull - will it dry?

Postby Reggie » Sun Dec 03, 2017 8:08 am

The plywood hull (which is sheathed on the outside with fabric and epoxy resin) on my Center Console is showing a moisture meter reading of close to 80% in places.

Away from the bilges, or on the sides it is between 11 and 15%.

The wood appears solid and I have ground away all residual paint and resin, leaving bare wood.

Any ideas if

1) I will ever get the moisture levels down
2) How I can be sure to not develop rot problems down the line?

Was thinking of drying it to below 15% and then epoxy coating/ sheathing with glass.

Any thoughts?

Help much appreciated...

283
Posts: 108
Joined: Mon Oct 23, 2017 10:14 am
Location: Maine

Re: Wet Plywood Stitch and Glue Hull - will it dry?

Postby 283 » Sun Dec 03, 2017 12:37 pm

To get the moisture level down you can try a dehumidifier under a tarp.
Mike

Reggie
Posts: 7
Joined: Sun Dec 03, 2017 8:02 am

Re: Wet Plywood Stitch and Glue Hull - will it dry?

Postby Reggie » Sun Dec 03, 2017 8:13 pm

Thanks - was thinking of that. Any ideas how long this usually takes?

283
Posts: 108
Joined: Mon Oct 23, 2017 10:14 am
Location: Maine

Re: Wet Plywood Stitch and Glue Hull - will it dry?

Postby 283 » Mon Dec 04, 2017 7:53 pm

IDK... as long as it takes :D

You don’t want to seal in any moisture.
Mike

PeterG
Posts: 560
Joined: Mon Dec 03, 2007 7:08 am
Location: Connecticut

Re: Wet Plywood Stitch and Glue Hull - will it dry?

Postby PeterG » Tue Dec 05, 2017 8:02 am

You might try warming the hull too, to help drive out the moisture. A space heater maybe under the hull with a tarp to trap the warm air, and dehumidifier should draw out the moisture. Once dry, I might consider using CPES on the interior, to soak into the wood and protect it. The CPES will keep the wood from absorbing enough moisture to enable rot to start. Follow that with a bilge paint coating for more protection and for appearance. I would not fiberglass the interior, a LOT of work would probably cause more problems than it would fix.
Murphy's Law: Anything that can go wrong, will go wrong.
Griffin's Law: Murphy was an optimist.


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