Resawing veneers

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Shaunh
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Resawing veneers

Post by Shaunh » Mon Feb 05, 2018 2:55 am

IMG_20180205_152242_187.jpg
Hi all.
Reading through the various posts on this board ( i have spent a lot of time researching the past month ) I see a number of ways builders have gone about making planking veneers. I thought it might be worth looking at this as a whole because these veneers are what the mahogany boats are all about. First point is a lot of timbers other than Mahogany are used. They share some characteristics though including being of low to medium density. This keeps the weight down but also is generally helpful when resawing. Resawing or deep ripping is the term used when sawing wide boards into thin planking veneers.
Generally stage one when making veneers is to dress the boards. I notice some don't but this can be dangerous. Presenting a wobbly board to a bench saw ( circular table saw ) can be very scary. Having a clean straight face and square edge is critical if you are resawing this way. The disadvantages of using a table saw are limits in depth of cut, often requiring sawing from both sides, high waste factor with big saw kerf and higher danger factor if the board springs. Never resaw with a cross cut or combination blade. Also very dangerous. A rip blade has fewer teeth with big gullets to clear the long shavings produced.
Another method is a bandsaw. These machines are made for this work although most home shop machines are a bit lightweight. If you are using a smaller machine then the correct blade becomes more critical as does feed speed. Push it hard and you will likely wander or the blade can belly in the middle of the board. Also, resawing generally requires a lot of tension on the blade. Some saws can't provide enough and some blades can't take a lot of it. Finally, around 1 tooth per inch ( aussies are all metric but not our saw blades! ) is about right. Too many teeth creates heat build up, dulls blades faster and doesn't clear waste very well. Can also burn out motors if the machine is labouring too much.
Finally, we have the purpose built resaw. The attached photos show mine. I just reset the guides and fence today as the new blade was tracking differently. I then ran this 1 1/2 inch Walnut piece through to test. Pretty consistent 3.9mm so was happy with that.
After sawing, you have clean up. You have to get the boards to even thickness. I have read that some guys sand them down by hand. Man, my mind boggles on that thought. It could takes weeks and no one likes sanding that much. The small bench top thicknessers can be really handy here. They are like a router on steroids and usually handle thin stock well. You can also run them through on a base board if you need. Keep in mind a machined finish can be a bit case hardened which can affect the glue bond. A light sand is sometimes a good idea prior to gluing to your ply. Sanding the ply as well is also a good idea to remove contaminants. My images show the veneers sitting on my thicknessing sander. It is accurate to 0.1mm so is the perfect machine for this job. Last year we processed approx 20m3 of timber into veneers and pressed most onto flat MDF. All these panels then went back through the sander for a 2.5mm finish on the veneers. Obviously on a boat there is a lot of hand sanding. Accurate prep work can reduce some sanding later. Hopefully this info is of some use. Cheers Shaun
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Shaunh
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Re: Resawing veneers

Post by Shaunh » Mon Feb 05, 2018 2:57 am

Here's another image. First time I have added images to a post. Still learning.
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sproggy
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Re: Resawing veneers

Post by sproggy » Mon Feb 05, 2018 3:45 am

Useful information, Shaun, thank you. I'm a long, long way from having a hull to veneer but I've already been giving it some thought and wondering how I'm going to create the veneers (or whether to ask someone to create the for me).

JimmY
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Re: Resawing veneers

Post by JimmY » Mon Feb 05, 2018 10:40 am

HI Shaun,

Good information. Just to add my $0.02...

Depending on what equipment you have access to, a table saw with a thin kerf blade may not be a bad option. When I re-sawed the mahogany for my deck, I had a friend with a 14" Jet bandsaw and a 1" wide re-saw blade. Once it was set up properly, it made easy work of the mahogany. However, the blade does leave a pretty rough surface that needed to be planned down. We ended up planning the board back to flat after each cut, and each final piece needed to be planned to thickness and to smooth it out. So while a bandsaw has a thinner kerf, the effective kerf may be similar to a table saw. Of course a 10" table saw will be limited to about a 6" wide board.
-Jim
Nothing says poor craftsmanship like wrinkles in your duct tape!

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Jimbob
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Re: Resawing veneers

Post by Jimbob » Mon Feb 05, 2018 10:50 am

Wow! That's some impressive equipment. Looks like a feeder and all.

I had a wide 4/4 board re-sawed at my hardwood supplier (it was over 12" in width) they used a bandsaw similar to the one in your pictures. One thing that I found out was that with the kerf on the blade they used, they could only get two boards out of a 4/4 board where with my bandsaw, I can get three boards for a 1/8" veneer. (a savings of 33%). I can re-saw up to 12" with my setup. I use a 1/2" blade with 3tpi. I added a fence and an out-feed table.
The machine has paid for itself. (or so I tell my wife) :lol:
Pic of my setup below:
Jim
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Shaunh
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Re: Resawing veneers

Post by Shaunh » Mon Feb 05, 2018 12:10 pm

Hi Jimmy. I agree a well set up rip saw can do a fantastic job. Have ripped many boards this way and the cleaner finish can help a lot overall with waste. Also you usually get a lot less blade wander so it can be realy effective. Just less so with deep boards and also the danger factor, especially when we are talking inexperienced wood workers. Most dangerous machine in the shop.
And Jim, nice set up on your saw. The big high fence offers support, good way to go. 3 tpi will work fine, just need to take it steady. We have also used an electric chainsaw sharpener or Dremel to touch up the blades in situ. Get about 4 sharpenings before we bin the blade. Helps keep the edge. Bit like a hnad plane, if you flog a blunt one it's just hard work!
As for justification to the wife, probably the biggest hurdle in any project. My boat will have her name on it, that seems to be working :D
Cheers.

Shaunh
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Re: Resawing veneers

Post by Shaunh » Mon Feb 05, 2018 12:29 pm

A note on recoveries. We usually get 3 x 3mm finished from a 2tmm board and 7 x 3mm from a 50mm board. I have got 8 on some really clewn boards taking it slow but the risk of losing a pice is higher when you cut it realy fine. Anyone only getting two from a 25m board should have a reassessment of the set up.

nybhh
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Re: Resawing veneers

Post by nybhh » Fri Sep 21, 2018 12:14 pm

Nice write up, thank you.
How does the thickness sander compare to a planer with regards to finish, accuracy and speed of material removal? I've never used one.
-Brandon

TomB
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Re: Resawing veneers

Post by TomB » Fri Sep 21, 2018 2:30 pm

Band saw blades matter, 3/4" is better than 1/2" and 1" is better yet. The wider blades ride in the kerf better and are less likely to wander. Set-up matters, alignment with the track of the blade, proper tension, guide placement...go through all the set-up steps for best results. Horsepower matters, I have a 3/4 HP saw that can handle 3-4" resaws if I take my time. I also have a 2 3/4HP beauty that isn't tested with 8" resaws. Here is my yield math: 4/4 rough gives me 7/8" finished two sides, which give me two 5/32" (4mm) and one 9/32" (7mm) finished two sides.

For surfacing, I use a benchtop planer. It works ok as long as I keep the planer blades sharp and pay attention to wood grain direction. (Not all benchtop planers are equal, 2 blade, 3 blade, rotary blade...mine is nothing special) A drum sander would be a nice addition and could easily remove resaw kerf marks and set final thickness for veneer. Sniping and grain blow-out would not be a problem as the material gets thinner while using a drum sander.

My two cents,

Tom

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Jimbob
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Re: Resawing veneers

Post by Jimbob » Fri Sep 21, 2018 4:28 pm

I wouldn't recommend a drum sander. I have a 16/24 Proformax (jet) drum sander, and it is more for finish work than thickness planing. It would take FOREVER to bring down to dimension. (many passes)

I have a Dewalt three blade two speed thickness planer that does a nice job. Very little snipe. It also has set stops going down to 1/8". (good for consistent thicknesses.) The optional infeed and outfeed tables helps to reduce snipe even further.

Jim
Jim Neeley
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TAB
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Re: Resawing veneers

Post by TAB » Wed Oct 03, 2018 6:27 pm

double stick tape and light cuts on a surface planer work fine. just stick it too a stable board( I use 3/4 mdf as I have it laying around.) at least once a month I cut some for work. I can easily clean up down to about .11" (~ 7/64") the key is scrap blades and cuts no bigger then 1/32" yes it can take awhile, but it works great. hot glue can work too, but I have had better luck with the tape. you just have to make sure there are no gaps between the boards or you will run into issues.

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