First boat

See: "Useful Information and Suppliers" for a list of lumber and plywood suppliers. Also see: "Wood & Plywood Information". Both located in the left-hand column of the Home page.

Moderator: Bill Edmundson

Post Reply
flabio
Posts: 20
Joined: Sun Dec 30, 2007 7:41 pm

First boat

Post by flabio » Wed Jan 09, 2008 8:34 pm

I have wanted to build a boat myself since I was in high school and watched one of our neighbors build one. Now that I have more free time I plan on building a bullet boat sometime this year. My question is since I have little woodworking experience would it be helpful to take an adult education class to learn some basics?
I also would like to have a list of woodworking tools that will help in the construction.

FDMSIV
Posts: 407
Joined: Tue Jun 06, 2006 12:28 pm
Location: New Orleans

Post by FDMSIV » Wed Jan 09, 2008 9:03 pm

In my opinion, the best teacher is yourself. I have learned more just by doing than any instructor could have taught. I would only suggest taking a course if you are uncomfortable working with power tools and unaware of the danger they pose is used incorrectly. There are no complicated joints (as far as Glen-L boats), pretty much just a square peg and round hole type of stuff... :wink:


As far as tools are concerned, I used the following

Table Saw
Circular Saw (very rarely)
Jig Saw
Random Orbit Sander (4")
Angle Grinder (4")
Belt Sander
Small and Medium Hand Plane (mostly the smaller one)
Electric Drill
Yankee Driver (Excellent tool in my opinion)

If you do not have it already, patience is about the only thing you really need to have. There have been days when I really do consider taking a match to the project, but you just have to keep on going.

basilkies
Posts: 496
Joined: Wed Sep 22, 2004 9:19 pm
Location: Marin California

Post by basilkies » Thu Jan 10, 2008 6:14 pm

I built a boat on my own my wood experience was very minimal, mostly hacking out shapes to cover with foam and material. Once I copied a drawer face on a built in drawer to fix it. Then the occasional stray door jam and door job.

You have plenty of experience to get started. Just be sure to read about how to select wood and learn about using epoxy. Epoxy isn't tricky or anything it's just good to know some technique for fiberglassing and how to thicken it correctly for various jobs. You'll be surprised at the versatility it gives you. You can fix anything with epoxy and make it look good, especially if you paint over it.

User avatar
leakcheck
Posts: 2950
Joined: Mon Nov 17, 2003 3:01 pm
Location: Lander Wyoming

Post by leakcheck » Thu Jan 10, 2008 6:33 pm

FDMSIV wrote:
As far as tools are concerned, I used the following

Table Saw
Circular Saw (very rarely)
Jig Saw
Random Orbit Sander (4")
Angle Grinder (4")
Belt Sander
Small and Medium Hand Plane (mostly the smaller one)
Electric Drill
Yankee Driver (Excellent tool in my opinion)

I
I agree with the above...as long as you are comfortable. I have built a house before but the knowledge I gained from that experience did not directly translate into the boat building knowledge I needed. Stuff is not plumb and square as I am used to both in building and plumbing. Wood is pretty much wood, but you can do it with some reading and some practice.
And in "Big Building" you dont have alot of use for the smaller tools as the sanders etc..which you will be using CONTINUOUSLY !!

I still have to pick up a number of planes and a bandsaw,. but I have most of the other stuff to complete my Coastal Cruiser (or is that a Dyno Jet)....

Steve :roll: :roll:

User avatar
brianm
Posts: 129
Joined: Tue Sep 13, 2005 12:29 pm

experience????

Post by brianm » Thu Jan 10, 2008 7:16 pm

I had no experience. I'd built a few shelves but thats it. The beauty of building your own boat is that you can take time, take MORE time or EVEN MORE TIME to make sure you've got good glue surfaces and good workmanship. Almost everything went well for me the first time through...a few things took some rework, but so what...my boat was the most fun project I've ever taken on.

The plans and design of mine have resulted in a boat that impresses everyone who comes aboard. All I had to do was follow the instructions and not cheap out on epoxy and floatation foam, and all is well.

Dive In!
here's the stiletto with a Yamaha 90 4 stroke

upspirate

Post by upspirate » Fri Jan 11, 2008 9:11 am

I've built 2 boats with minimal woodworking experience& just hand tools & a drill & saber saw & belt sander.

With that said if you feel you would benefit from an adult wood class ,take it!I'm thinking of doing that to get some experience on table saw,band saw,planner,jointer etc which I have no experience with.

You also may make friends with people that can help you when you need more than 2 hands on your later build

FDMSIV
Posts: 407
Joined: Tue Jun 06, 2006 12:28 pm
Location: New Orleans

Post by FDMSIV » Fri Jan 11, 2008 9:46 am

I hate to say that I actually learned something from a Yankee, but "New Yankee Workshop" and "This Old House" are great shows for familarizing yourself with basic power tools, and the shows are fun to watch. Although it is a little frustrating when Norm takes some wood over to his Top-o-da-line table saw, and then to the T-o-d-l router, then to the ..... You get the picture, it just isn't fair when someone has all of the cool toys.

Post Reply

Return to “Wood and Plywood”