pre cut parts

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flabio
Posts: 20
Joined: Sun Dec 30, 2007 7:41 pm

pre cut parts

Post by flabio » Wed Feb 20, 2008 9:01 pm

I am thinking about building a bullet boat over the winter. I have little or no carpentry experience and was wondering if I went to a local cabinet mfg near my office that builds and assembles wood cabinets if it would be feasible to bring the plans and materials to them and have them precut all of the boat members and then assemle the boat myself.

Soloboat
Posts: 397
Joined: Mon Mar 05, 2007 10:51 pm
Location: Orange CA

pre cut parts

Post by Soloboat » Wed Feb 20, 2008 11:51 pm

If you have already aquired your lumber I think actually transferring the patterns to lumber then cutting them out yourself is not that difficult. It also gives you a good idea of what the next step then the next step ought to be.Sounds as if you may be pressed for time if you aren't doit yourself.
) Champagne dreams and wishes are possible on a beer budget. Just build the boat.
Nice curves are easy on the eyes.
Go sell crazy somewhere else we're all stocked up here."As Good As It Gets" Jack Nicholson.

FDMSIV
Posts: 407
Joined: Tue Jun 06, 2006 12:28 pm
Location: New Orleans

Post by FDMSIV » Thu Feb 21, 2008 10:59 am

I agree with Soloboat, cutting out the frames is not very hard and you really get a feeling for how everything is going to go together. Using the transfer paper is a little tricky but not something that is impossible to do. You can probably trace the frames in a couple of hours, cutting is super easy once the line are down.

You don't have to be super exact when cutting. You are going to be sanding and fairing just about everything.

GeorgeD
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Joined: Sat Jan 19, 2008 5:26 pm
Location: Hartley Wintney, Hampshire, UK
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Post by GeorgeD » Sat Feb 23, 2008 1:37 am

Hi flabio,

I too have little or no carpentry experience and I am [gulp] attempting to build a Zip. :shock:

I have so far managed to trace out and cut about half my frames and all is going fine so far - i.e. no major mistakes. The only "tools" I have really needed so far have been a pencil, A4 carbon paper, a ruler, a jigsaw and various sanders (belt, mouse and hand-block). I wish I had a router (and knew how to use one), but I dont, so I'm sticking with what I know. Oh, and get yourself the best dust mask you can afford!!

This has already been really good experience and every time I do something I learn something new. I reckon that this learning curve will put me in good shape when I come to the more difficult stuff. I originally wanted a framekit but now I am glad that Glen-L had sold out!

For my 2p's worth (or 2c for you guys), I would say, if time allows, go for it and build it all yourself. It's great fun, you get a feeling of achievement at the end of even the smallest task being completed, and you will learn a lot as you go, even from mistakes.

Finally a tip from another newbie...I have found the easiest and most accurate way is to trace each frame section onto thick paper or card (I use a roll of left over heavy duty wallpaper!), then cut this out and use it as a template. I then use a pencil to trace around the template straight onto the wood. I cut just outside the line then sand down to fit on my layout board. Go as slow as you need to for the first one and you will do the rest in no time.

Good luck!!

GeorgeD
What's the rush? Getting it finished?!
Zip project started: January 2008
Project site: http://www.hartdale.co.uk/blog/

Petruzzi
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Joined: Sun Feb 17, 2008 12:14 pm
Location: Ashland, MA
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Post by Petruzzi » Sat Feb 23, 2008 11:57 am

That's some good advice George. I don't know anything about all paper but some red rosin paper might be better as a template as it may be stiffer. It is something that is readily available available at most LOWE'S or Home Depots as well as local hardware stores.

As for not having experience with carpentry tools, I want to say this. The tools will still operate the same way for anyone. The difference between experienced and not is how comfortable you feel using some power tools. The most important thing you can do is read the instruction manual and all safety precautions. You can learn how to saftly use most power tools pretty quickly so if you have some scrap play around a liitle to get the hang of things of have a friend who is experienced with tools help you learn the tools.
bugging the Glen L staff since the 10th grade ;-)

Petruzzi
Posts: 10
Joined: Sun Feb 17, 2008 12:14 pm
Location: Ashland, MA
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Post by Petruzzi » Sat Feb 23, 2008 12:08 pm

one more thing. the best advice i can give you is DO NOT rush things. take your time and do things right the first time. When I was building my eight-ball I rushed the build because I wanted to use it on a camping trip that was coming up. At that point I had skipped a few things which didn work out to well. a good example was the trim pieces on the outside of the two sides. I left them off because I didnt have enough time thinking they were only for looks. without them there turns out the side were very flimsy and it led to one of the seat brakets breaking while trying to re entner the boat from the water.
bugging the Glen L staff since the 10th grade ;-)

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