Angled Cuts on Transom of Huck Finn

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Grand Chillin
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Angled Cuts on Transom of Huck Finn

Post by Grand Chillin »

Guys,
I know I have another thread here about my choice of wood for this project. I stated before I'm new to forums, so if I'm doing anything wrong please inform me. ( If you have to school me that will be OK, I can take it ) :D
Here we go. I need ideas, suggestions, help, etc, on building the transom, I mean transoms on my Huck Finn. The plans call for a 6 degree angle on the bottom and sides. I plan on attaching the framing members to the plywood before making the angle. The bottom has two laminates and the outer one is notched for the chine. My problem is limited power tools. No table saw or band saw.
I'm going to try and post a picture of the plans.
Happy Thanksgiving, Chip
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A secret to a good marriage is to have a quick mind and a slow mouth!!!

upspirate

Re: Angled Cuts on Transom of Huck Finn

Post by upspirate »

What tools do you have available?

Do you have friends/co-workers with table saw?

Shanty
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Re: Angled Cuts on Transom of Huck Finn

Post by Shanty »

http://glen-l.com/phpBB2/viewtopic.php? ... ood#p53464

Have a look at this.... seems real good to me!

S

jcallends
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Re: Angled Cuts on Transom of Huck Finn

Post by jcallends »

If you really want to build this boat you should do some serious thinking about buying a few tools. It is possible to cut all the angles you need with a hand saw but would be extremely difficult to say the least. A portable saw is probably the bare minimum unless you are a journeyman carpenter. Portable saws cost from $ 40 up to several hundred dollars. For angled cuts such as you have they work quite well if you clamp your material and use a cutting guide. Cutting guides made from a piece of straight stock clamped in place work very well. If you purchase a portable saw I wood suggest practicing on some scrap material before you try to cut the parts you need for your boat.

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BruceDow
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Re: Angled Cuts on Transom of Huck Finn

Post by BruceDow »

Do you have a basic hand-held circular saw? You can simply adjust the blade angle.
Bruce.

~~ Do what you love, and love what you do. ~~
~~ To me - only my boat is not yet perfect. Everybody else's is to be admired for I know the path they have walked (Dave Lott, 2010) ~~
Dow's Monaco Project

Nova SS
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Re: Angled Cuts on Transom of Huck Finn

Post by Nova SS »

Bruce Dow wrote:Do you have a basic hand-held circular saw? You can simply adjust the blade angle.

Thats how I did it :wink:

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Grand Chillin
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Re: Angled Cuts on Transom of Huck Finn

Post by Grand Chillin »

Tools I have:

Jig Saw
20 year circular saw with bent fence that I don't trust
Belt sander
Orbital sander
Miter saw

I am considering taken advantage of tomorrow's sales and buying a table saw. Have the bottom cut figured out. But I still don't know how I will do the side cuts. They are tapered and angled at 6 degrees. I hope everyone had a nice Thanksgiving. :)

Chip
A secret to a good marriage is to have a quick mind and a slow mouth!!!

Nova SS
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Re: Angled Cuts on Transom of Huck Finn

Post by Nova SS »

well if you do get a table saw you can do both tapered and angled cuts with it. Good luck. BUT if you dont at least get a new circular saw and use that. AS someone mentioned you can clamp a guide to the wood and follow that with the circular saw. That way the cuts are (straight) and if you angle the base of the saw you can cut your angles as well.

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BruceDow
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Re: Angled Cuts on Transom of Huck Finn

Post by BruceDow »

I would vote for good hand tools (circular saw, jigsaw) over cheap stationary tools (table saw, band saw)
Bruce.

~~ Do what you love, and love what you do. ~~
~~ To me - only my boat is not yet perfect. Everybody else's is to be admired for I know the path they have walked (Dave Lott, 2010) ~~
Dow's Monaco Project

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Grand Chillin
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Re: Angled Cuts on Transom of Huck Finn

Post by Grand Chillin »

Thaks Guys,
I'll let y'all know how it turns out.
A secret to a good marriage is to have a quick mind and a slow mouth!!!

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Grand Chillin
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Re: Angled Cuts on Transom of Huck Finn

Post by Grand Chillin »

Well I went and did it. Took advantage of Friday's sales and bought a table saw. The only problem with it is the fence, but I already have a solution for that. Used it to make the 6 degree cuts on the sides and bottom of one transom. I had already glued the side and bottom frames on leaving some overhang. The bottom was easy, I cut the inter frame oversized and screwed it to the outer frame. Used the fence and made the cut. Made a jig for the sides because they are angled. Made those cuts, removed the inter frame, which is now beveled on the sides and bottom. Notched the inter frame for the keel and chine logs. Hopefully will attach transom to building form tomorrow.
A secret to a good marriage is to have a quick mind and a slow mouth!!!

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Grand Chillin
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Re: Angled Cuts on Transom of Huck Finn

Post by Grand Chillin »

One more comment on this thread and I'm going to shut up. I promise! :lol: Cut the notches in the first two bulkheads with my jig saw. We all know how that went, good on cut side. Flip it over and blade drift on the other. How did I solve this problem on the other bulkheads you ask. Good ole muscle power. I got me a short, fine tooth hand saw. No engine, cord or batteries. Granddad always said "if you have to plug it in you are asking for trouble son."
Chip
A secret to a good marriage is to have a quick mind and a slow mouth!!!

Oyster
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Re: Angled Cuts on Transom of Huck Finn

Post by Oyster »

I call this saw a "short stroker". You can even cut with the end of it in confined areas. Thats how rigid it is. The teeth are rough and the metal is thick which makes it rigid. I cut almost all of my notches with it, making the side cuts of the widths and then take a very sharp chisel and clean out my notches. Its very accurate. If you oversize or miscut the notches, the beauty of thickened epoxy is that you can back fill and let cure with a temporary block to hold things in its right place with a small piece of plastic or wax paper. I also use duct tape on the small block and counterbore the small block and fasten it in place and let the glue cure and remove it.
Image

http://www.lowes.com/lowes/lkn?action=p ... old%20Grip

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Grand Chillin
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Re: Angled Cuts on Transom of Huck Finn

Post by Grand Chillin »

Oyster,
That is exactly what I got, not the same brand. Probably made at the same place.
A secret to a good marriage is to have a quick mind and a slow mouth!!!

Oyster
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Re: Angled Cuts on Transom of Huck Finn

Post by Oyster »

Grand Chillin wrote:Oyster,
That is exactly what I got, not the same brand. Probably made at the same place.
They are all the same. Before the saws came out, I use to use the saw from a moulding mitre saw but was too bulky and unbalanced because of the length of it. The tapered blade and length is the best of all worlds for cutoffs. The saws are also cheaper than the japanese hand saws and do a better job for rough duty applications for hardwoods and the likes.

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