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Re: gorilla glue

Posted: Sun Mar 21, 2010 3:50 pm
by slug
Having an allergy to epoxy forces one to look for alternatives. I've had excellent success with "titebond 3". It is waterproof and has some gap filling capabilities and I don't have to wait 2 days before I can use the joint. I've used it on all my batten scarf joints.
However, on the planking I'm using MAS epoxy with their new "low tox" hardener with great success so far....no reactions :D
Not cheap tho.
Doug

Re: gorilla glue

Posted: Fri Mar 16, 2018 7:08 am
by Cooley
I'm just starting a new build and intend on using Gorilla Glue. It should be just fine since the entire hull shall be encased in epoxy.

Re: gorilla glue

Posted: Sat Mar 17, 2018 10:16 am
by chugalug
:D I used some of that in my build .I'm also trying something that's supposed to glue frozen green treat lumber together.came in 40 oz tubes.I used some titebond 3 in interior panels and destroyed the panel trying to remove it later

Re: gorilla glue

Posted: Thu Apr 26, 2018 8:51 pm
by raymacke
On my now 18 year old Cabin Skiff I used Gorilla Glue on one joint - the skeg. It is the only glue joint that has failed on the well used boat. In my estimation, if you don't want to use epoxy, Titebond 3 is far superior. A few years back I believe it was Wood Magazine that did glue stress testing and the liquid polyurethanes did not do well - at least compared to epoxy and Titebond. Titebond is cheaper, stores longer, easier to use and cleans up with water.

Because of my sever reaction to epoxy I also extensively used PL Premium Construction Adhesive [urlhttps://www.amazon.com/Loctite-Polyurethane-Con ... B001E3VQBE][/url] when building the True Grit. It is also a polyurethane but not the liquid. After 8 yrs there have been no failures.

I highly suggest you make some test blocks gluing two pieces together and then smack them with a hammer to break them. When I did this with Gorilla every joint broke on the glue line and pulled no or very little wood fiber. With Titebond 3 and PL the breaks were always to the wood not the glue joint. Personally, I have no use for the liquid polys but hey, that's just me!

Re: gorilla glue

Posted: Wed Jul 18, 2018 6:36 am
by DC88
Did anyone ever use the CT1 products for kayak construction? I went into a DIY shop the other day and there was a display brick with lots of materials attached to it including a handle. I lifted the brick by the handle and it looks like it was very well stuck. When I have asked the salesman about performance when used on a bot under the water level he didn't inspire me too much trust. But still... the glue looks really good and not sure whether I should use it on my Canadian kayak project or not!
Here is the shop https://www.foxschandlery.com/ct1
I have searched for it online and noticed that even chandleries stock this item but in fact is called a Construction adhesive...
Any ideas?

Re: gorilla glue

Posted: Wed Jul 18, 2018 11:23 am
by sproggy
There is nothing in the description of that product that suggests it's even remotely suitable for wooden boatbuilding. Unless you were to use it in place of 3M 5200, which isn't something you'd use to build a kayak either, I suspect. I wouldn't touch it - why look for something different when there are so many well tested adhesives available that are known to be suitable?

Re: gorilla glue

Posted: Wed Jul 18, 2018 1:37 pm
by Jimbob
When I first started my build, I had very little experience with epoxy. I was only familiar with Titebond 1 part glue and didn't like the idea of mixing up 2 part glue with a cure time. I got some poxy-grip epoxy from Glen-L. It is now my preferred glue. Why worry about some other glue, when epoxy is a proven glue for marine applications.
Jim

Re: gorilla glue

Posted: Thu Jul 19, 2018 9:23 pm
by raymacke
From the company's description, it sounds similar to 3M 5200 but it does not state if it is a polyurethane. It also states it can be painted which also makes me think it is not a polyurethane. I personally would prefer a polyurethane as I feel they are superior - but that's just my opinion. I have read where some builders have used 5200 as a wood adhesive and seemed happy with the results.

My thoughts are it might work in some situations but be problematic in others. For one, it is a somewhat flexible bond. This could be a plus for some joints but very undesirable for others. Also, similar sounding products I have used do not sand well and it is near impossible get a smooth joint as the glue tends to always stand proud of the surface (they are rubbery and the wood beside it is sanded away before the adhesive leaving a visible glue line).

IMHO epoxy is the glue of choice 99% of the time. I love the stuff but unfortunately it hates me. Still, I use it all the time but only in small amounts and with extreme caution because of my sensitivity. For above the waterline situations as I mentioned above I have also had great results with Titebond 3.

But still, if not for my allergic reaction I would almost always default to epoxy. It is just so versatile. What other single adhesive is a totally waterproof and allows the user to vary the viscosity from thin enough to laminating glass cloth to as thick as peanut butter to be used as a filler - all while maintaining its high strength.

Re: gorilla glue

Posted: Fri Jul 20, 2018 6:11 am
by Bill Edmundson
I could have written Ray's answer! Ditto.

Bill