Alternatives to Fiberglass Basalt Fiber Cloth

Fiberglassing over plywood and one-off fiberglass methods. See: "Boatbuilding Methods", in the left-hand column of the Home page.

Moderator: ttownshaw

User avatar
JiminTex
Posts: 15
Joined: Wed Jul 05, 2017 8:14 pm

Alternatives to Fiberglass Basalt Fiber Cloth

Postby JiminTex » Sat Aug 12, 2017 11:59 am

Has anyone considered using Basalt Fiber Cloth instead of Fiberglass? I am aware of Dynel and Carbon/ Kevlar. The reason I am asking is this material which is now cheaper to obtain for me. Has a unique properties. It is made from stone, It is non combustible and fire retardant. It also can form a EMF barrier. This website while I was researching has it for hand layup with polyester resin.

http://basaltft.com/app/lay.htm

http://www.ebay.com/itm/BASALT-FIBER-CL ... SwA3dYNWPp

baslat.JPG

User avatar
JiminTex
Posts: 15
Joined: Wed Jul 05, 2017 8:14 pm

Re: Alternatives to Fiberglass Basalt Fiber Cloth

Postby JiminTex » Sat Aug 12, 2017 12:05 pm

Basalt2.JPG

User avatar
JiminTex
Posts: 15
Joined: Wed Jul 05, 2017 8:14 pm

Re: Alternatives to Fiberglass Basalt Fiber Cloth

Postby JiminTex » Fri Aug 25, 2017 10:32 am

I had sent an email to a company in Houston, Texas inquiring about there Basalt Fiber Cloth.
The company is http://www.sudaglass.com

I am considering using a Basalt fiber cloth for building my boat. This product is stronger and more resilience to use in a
Salt water environment and has unique fire resistance and EMF reduction. The designer calls for 7oz per sq yard fiberglass
on transom and hulls with a minimum of 4oz on deck and roof this is a cold molded design over Plywood.(Glen-L Boat
Designs). What does your company recommend as a comparable material weight and cloth design for this application? This would be adhered to the hull with a polyester resin or similar epoxy and then Glassed over, Also what weave would your company recommend?

There answer:

Dear James

Thank you for contacting us. You are correct--basalt fabrics will give significant improvements over fiberglass in boat construction. The biggest advantage is that unlike fiberglass, basalt filaments does not absorb water through the core of the filament. This means that exposed filaments on the surface of your boat will not wick water into the core of your lamination.

This water absorption is the primary mechanism in the formation of blisters in fiberglass boats. Any time the gel coat is chipped or cracked and the boat is exposed long-term to water, you will get a blister.

I attach a list of the basalt products we stock in our Houston warehouse. We have fabrics close in weight to what you need.

The satin fabrics are tricky to work with because they are very deformable. The twill weaves are next in stability, with the plain weaves the most stable.

We do not have any 60" fabrics in inventory. The widest is 51". We have several 50" width fabrics in inventory. Our one meter wide fabrics are 39.34", very close to the 40" width you need.

Note that we have bi-axial and quad-axial fabrics in 50" width. These are not actually woven. The filaments are laid out on a special table and then knit-stitched together with a polyester thread. The idea is to hold them together long enough to lay them out and incorporate them into a composite structure. I am out of the 450 gram/sq. meter 0/90 degree fabric (BA-450-13-0.90-127) but will have more in 40 days or so. The rest are in stock.

You are welcome to come by our warehouse and look at our fabrics. This may be useful in picking the right fabric.

Also feel free to call for more information or answers. Call us at 281 496-5427.

We look forward to working with you on your project.

With kind regards,
James Streetman, Manager
james@sudaglass.com
Advanced Filament Technologies LLC
tel. 281-496-5427
fax 281-496-4233

Skype: James.Streetman
Whatsap 713 724-2626
http://www.sudaglass.com
SUDAGLASS(r) is a registered trademark of Advanced Filament Technologies LLC


Return to “Fiberglass”

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 1 guest