Rampage Update 2017

Designs for inboard or outboard power

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Denon Osterman
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Rampage Update 2017

Postby Denon Osterman » Sun Jun 18, 2017 8:41 pm

Well, it looks like I skipped a year...Oops!

Quick foreward - a sincere apologies to everyone for disappearing from the forum completely. It seems starting and running your own business is a full time job and then some...and I had to put boat building on hold for a little over a year. On that note, a *massive* and humble shoutout to Gayle and John for everything they do...it isn't easy, and they do a great job!

Now, onto the project - I'll use this post to keep a running tab of my work on my Rampage, "No Limits", for this summer. There's a chance I might actually get it in the water and on to dry land to drop in the engine...and only 9 years after I started :wink:

At the end of 2015 I'd completed the flip, and framed in the coaming / carling / dash / deck beams...the decking plywood had also been framed. For some reasons the pictures stopped working, but to see the *entire* build from start to finish,click the following link (no facebook account required)https://www.facebook.com/media/set/?set=a.1007656525867.2003777.1658550263&type=1&l=410d0be633 All pictures will appear there as I go, so if I leave any out from the post or they stop showing up, just go there to view them!

So far I've only gotten a few weekends in this year, but the "to do" list is getting shorter and shorter! All that's left are the floor, seats, hardware (fuel, electrical, instruments, controls, etc), decking, and engine...in roughly that order. I'm going to try and post an update with pictures every weekend for the rest of the summer...we'll see how that goes, as I'm already combining three weekends in one in this update!

Weekend 1 - Took stock of things. It had been a while since I worked on the boat, so I mostly wanted to know what I did and did not have left, what I'd need to move forward, etc. Did quite a bit of work on measuring things for engine / exhaust clearance, seats, etc. Nothing photo worthy in week 1, sadly.

Weekend 2 - This is where the work started. I realized I hadn't actually quite fit my front decking yet, and hadn't done *any* of the fairing on the sheer line for the decking. So I spent pretty much the entire weekend doing this. I did finally decide exactly how I want the decking, coaming, and dash to all mate...but haven't quite finished getting it done yet. And, I realized that now would likely be a good time to route a gap for the bow light wires - this weeks only picture:

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Weekend 3 - June 18th - Don't worry, I wouldn't post a new topic without pictures! This weekend is where the real fun started. I decided that before I went forward with all of the "final" work like seats, floor, engine mounting, etc, it would be ideal to actually mock in the engine. The problem is I can neither afford nor lift a real big block chevy at this stage, so a foam mock up worked as the perfect substitute. It will be used to rig up the cooling lines, exhaust, engine mounts, pretty much everything. Here's a shot of it mounted in the boat, about where I'm planning on having it sit:

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It's quite a bit further from the pump than I would have liked, but between fitting in wet exhaust and clearing the coamings, I didn't have much choice. On that note, if anyone knows where to get a proper double u-joint shaft of that length that's splined for a jet pump on one end...

Two more shots, showing the rough fore/aft spacing and the view from the back. In the first pic, the floor (see later in this update) is visible on the far right, and the single member spanning the stringers is where the *back* of the rear bench should align. This spacing should leave enough room for both exhaust at the back, and all of the spinning stuff (there isn't much on a jet as there's no water pump) up front. The other shot from behind just makes me want to finish this thing and get it in the water :D

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The next major step this weekend was the floor...or at least getting started on it. A lot of people have asked why I'm not just using plywood or carpet...to cut down on weight and cost, and make it simple. While it's an attractive option, I wanted to do something special for "No Limits" - and decided some mahagony slats would add a very nice touch to the rest of the boat. The "floor" will only exist for where passengers feet might be - in front of the bench seats. The engine compartment and under the bow will be left "as is" and varnished to show off the frames, etc.

First and foremost, I needed a *lot* of mahagony slats - roughly 1" square. The scale model I made came in handy as I'd forgotten to measure exactly how much wood I'd need, but was able to use the model to find out I'd need exactly 24 square feet - in 6' x 6" sections - to make the plank. The folks at Noah's Marine in Toronto helped me out and I found myself with exactly the wood I needed. Thanks to a thickness planner and table saw I had the rough strips - exactly 0.82" square (20 mm), which combined with my 0.5" gaps is the golden ratio!

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I didn't want any sharp corners, so each and every member was routed on it's top edges with an 1/8th inch roundover bit to give it a subtle curve and smoothness, which I think will really shine through when the floors are finished. It's all in the small details! The pictures below show a jig I fastened that exactly held the members to the router - making the work very, very easy - and the finished product. The routed strip is on the left, compared to the "sharp edged" on the right:

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With all of the members ready to go, it was time to cut them to length and start spacing things out. I'm going to have 6 sections in the end, all removable - a "center", "left", and "right" for both the front and back bench. The "centers" are between the stringers, and the "lefts/rights" go between the stringers and the chines - all at the height of the bottom of the stringers, i.e. the setup level for this boat, which matches very well to the chines. The center sections are much easier as they're square, with consistent 26" width...the sides will be more difficult.

Once I'd cut 26" off each 6' strip, I had 42 strips of 26" and 42 strips of ~4 feet, which would later get halved and trimmed to length for the side sections. I didn't have them yet, though, because they were wider than the stringers and were perfect for "visualizing" the floor. Below is my first attempt at spacing them out, though it was later re positioned slightly. Ultimately the "front" section gets an extra 4 strips - 23 vs 19 - because, well, that's where I sit, and most cars have less rear legroom than front anyways! There's also an overhead shot, showing the rough spacing and how you can "see through" the floor to the underlying work, something I wanted to keep. I still have one layer of epoxy and varnish on the inside, but I've decided to save that until *everything* has been mocked in, so I don't end up having to re do it.

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Once I'd settled on the spacing and everything, I decided to bite the bullet and make the two middle floor panels. I'm still not 100% sure what they'll rest on to keep them off the floor...likely some thicker lumber "legs" with rubber "feet". But, I do know that each panel will rest on three lengthwise members underneath. Only epoxy would be used as screws would take forever, add weight, detract from the look of the planks, and not really serve any purpose once the epoxy has cured anyways! Unfortunately, trying to get ~20 strips to lie evenly on three other members is damn near impossible when each and every one has the slightest curve. So, I decided on just the outer two for now, and I'll add the third at a later date.

Here's the first step - squaring up the outer most strips on the two support members, and clamping everything down to ensure it stays square. Then the two support members get a nice liberal helping of epoxy everywhere.

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Ok, here's where it might get a tiny bit confusing...each and every plank was spaced by sliding the half inch scrap (the light wood) between it and the preceeding strip. This meant the preceding strip needed to be clamped firmly so it wouldn't move itself...but I only had so many clamps. So what I did was "leapfrog" the blue clamps and then use a "real" C clamp every 3rd strip. The strips that didn't get a C clamp would rest in place through gravity, allowing the epoxy to cure, and the c clamps every so often would ensure no matter what I did, I'd only ever mess up a maximum of three strips. In this picture, both blue clamps have been used twice already (the two strips they're currently on, and the two "un clamped" strips from earlier), and I'm about to clamp the next strip with a C clamp. Then the blue clamps will be taken off and used for the next two strips...etc etc.

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The next two pictures will hopefully clear everything up. They show me halfway through, and the final, completed section (this is the "front middle" section). Note how every third strip is clamped with c clamps, and how the two blue clamps are temporarily used to hold the remaining strips as I work my way up the support members. I checked it the next day, and all of the strips were firmly glued to the floor - and that will only get stronger as the entire thing gets encapsulated!

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That was all I managed to get through this weekend...next weekend I'm likely going to try and finish the floors, and see if I can make some measurements for control cables, etc. I might mix things up and finish the deck fitment, or if I'm really lucky, I'll manage to get all of it done (unlikely, though). Another huge apology for disappearing for so long, both in my own updates and in participating in the rest of the forum - I'm going to try catching up now that I've got a tiny bit more free time!

Last but not least, the standard "overhead progress shot" - I'll try and get one of these every week at the end of each update, so you guys can get a birds eye view of what has / hasn't happened.

Thanks!

Denon

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Last edited by Denon Osterman on Sun Jun 25, 2017 8:27 pm, edited 2 times in total.

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Roberta
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Re: Rampage Update 2017

Postby Roberta » Mon Jun 19, 2017 4:45 am

Look's Great!! The Rampage was a boat I seriously considered until the Torpedo was released the first time. Keep us all posted.

Roberta :D :D :D :D
Roberta "Queen of the Boat Builders"
Built Zip "Oliver IV", Super Spartan "Jimmy 70", and Torpedo "The Glen L".

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BayouBengal
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Re: Rampage Update 2017

Postby BayouBengal » Mon Jun 19, 2017 6:21 am

Congrats on the restart. What you've got so far looks great and it would have been a shame not to finish.

DSR
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Re: Rampage Update 2017

Postby DSR » Tue Jun 20, 2017 5:04 pm

Hi Denon.

I'm fairly new here but I've followed through your previous threads when you started your Rampage several times. It looks great and I've been really curious to see how your design changes would work out.
I grew up around jets and V-drives and I love them!

I'm planning on building a Tornado once I get this little jet TNT that I'm currently working on finished and I can only hope that they turn out half as nice as your Rampage is looking.

Glad to see you back at it! :D

Thanks
Dave
DSR Performance - Home of yet another jet TNT build :D
Codename "Just A Little....."
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Denon Osterman
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Re: Rampage Update 2017

Postby Denon Osterman » Sun Jun 25, 2017 8:21 pm

Hi All,

Thansk for the kind words! Don't worry - I'm not letting this go until it's finished. With any luck, I'll actually get everything but the engine done by the end of this summer...fingers crossed, at least.

Dave, the design changes are looking promising so far, but I think the story will be better told when the decking is on and it's ready to go. Amazingly, a local (professional) builder built one "to spec", so with any luck I'll be able to do some "side by side" shots when it's all said and done, for a direct comparison of how things have changed. Can I ask why you're interested in the tornado instead of the rampage? After my TNT I swore I'd never build a flat bottom again...it's just too hard to enjoy them when rough. And the Rampage / Tornado are otherwise nearly identical (I have a long, 10+ year old thread on this hidden somewhere, and am very thankful to everyone for convincing me to go with the Rampage!)

Anyways, onto this weeks update - as always, see the link in the first post to see the full album and extra pictures (I think I fixed the link this time).

I've gotten all the floors glued now - or at least, they're curing. I ended up not being able to do the clamp walking thing from last weekend for the spacing, so it's a little more freeform...but I doubt anyone will notice! Here's the front left piece drying - note the staggered length on the right side, which will conform nicely to the chine line once it's all been sanded.

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Just to get the dried floor sections out of the way, I put them into the hull - note that this is not how they'll end up, spacing wise, as they'll stradle some frame members and be more even in their heights relative to each other. They'll also be much more level, though I'm still working on both aspects and likely won't have them fully fitted until next weekend.

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The next two photos show some preliminary fitting work on the side pieces, which are *much* more involved than the middles will be...because the frames stick out of and through them! Things are still a bit angled because I haven't faired the chines / floor section to each other, but they should rest nearly level when done, and be supported their entire length by the chine. The stringer facing side is supported by the frame, and will get two more "feet" at each corner. Last but not least, the floor member that had to be cut out where the frame passes through will be faired to rest on the frame, flush with the rest of the floor - but will be attached to the frame (epoxy), and not the rest of the floor (which is removable). This is just so the floor is "even", and I think it will look nicer as well.

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While I was waiting for the other floor sections to dry, I also got some more work done on my front decking / dash / coaming mating. What I'm trying to do is relatively complicated but in essence, I don't want anyone to know that there's plywood hidden under the veneers (other than you fine folk, of course! :wink: ). For the entire sheer line, this isn't an issue, because a rub rail will cap it and you won't see it. But for where the deck projects up onto the coaming, you'd be able to see. I've never liked the look of the coaming poking through the deck as suggested in the plans (by rabbeting the inner half of the coaming), but it did give me an idea - if I rabbet plane as suggested, I can hide the plywood in there, and then overdeck everything with the mahagony veneers.

The first step was to clamp a member in place against the coaming to support my plane, so that it would only take away the inner half of the coaming:

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Next up was planning all of the coaming, along with sanding the dash to remain fair and meet rabbeted section of the coaming. This allows the plywood to sit neatly within the coamings, but on top of the dash, which I want it to do:

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However - and this is where it gets complicated - I also don't want the edge of the plywood that overhangs the dash to be visible. Or the bottom part, for that matter. So the plywood deck will get some very, very short strips of mahagony veneer stapled underneath the deck (butting against the dash, and protuding an inch aft of the plywood). Then a planned strip of mahagony will be fastened to the top of these veneers, butted up against the edge of the plywood...this creates an artificial mahagony edge. As this edge should also look seamless, it too must fit into a rabbeted section of the coamings, which is why there's an extra inch of rabbet past the plywood in the above picture.

But - and this is where things get really confusing - I also want the decking itself to mate flush with the coaming. So not only is there a rabbet, but the last section of the coaming (from the dash onwards, to keep the lines fair) gets planned down by a 1/4" so that the top section of decking can rest flush in it, and never protude "past" the coaming. I promise this will all be much easier to understand when I finally have some pictures showing the completion this area! But, the final image below might clear things up:

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From the bottom right, we see the dash and the initial rabbet that the plywood decking fits in. So far, so good. However, as we saw in the previous photo, the rabbet extends an inch past the edge of the plywood - this is so a piece of mahagony the same thickness as the plywood can butt up against the edge of the plywood, hiding the plywood edge. Last but not least, the top surface of the coaming also begins to get planed into from the dash back - this is so the top veneers, which rest on top of the plywood and fake mahagony edge, also set into the coaming instead of laying "on top". Everything will also be generously radiused, already shown in the plywood above, to mimic the rear curve of the coaming instead of having a "hard" corner.

As I said, it should make more sense once it's done!

That's pretty much it for this week. I also measured for my steering, throttle, and shifter and hope to order those this week so I can install them next weekend. With any luck, I'll get the floors finished as well - and maybe even getting the pump completely ready to mount, and installing the lights, wiring, and gauges.

Last but not least, the progress shot from this week...not much to see, admittedly!

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Thanks all,

Denon

DSR
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Re: Rampage Update 2017

Postby DSR » Mon Jun 26, 2017 12:08 pm

Hi Denon.

I've always had a soft spot for v-drive flatties after my first ride in an ex-APBA S/S that one of my friend's fathers bought when I was young. It was a rush like no other and has stuck with me ever since. Having driven and ridden in quite a few since has just reinforced that feeling.
Where I live here in Southwest Michigan has a lot of protected waters so it's pretty easy to find a lake to run it on. I definitely agree that they aren't anything close to a soft ride, but for me, that's part of the charm of the old flats..... :D

Dave
DSR Performance - Home of yet another jet TNT build :D
Codename "Just A Little....."
viewtopic.php?f=23&t=29753

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Re: Rampage Update 2017

Postby DSR » Mon Jun 26, 2017 12:32 pm

Oh, I was also curious if you have a bullet already picked out for the Rampage? Sounds like a big Chevy in the plans?
DSR Performance - Home of yet another jet TNT build :D
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Denon Osterman
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Re: Rampage Update 2017

Postby Denon Osterman » Mon Jun 26, 2017 5:28 pm

Hi Dave,

Fair enough - that makes sense. Unfortunately my lake can get pretty rough, and at some point (for me at least) it stops being fun and starts being painful!

Yep, a BBC is the plan...torn between a 454, 496, and 502. In a perfect world I'd magically become an expert on engine building and do my own 496 from the ground up...but we'll see what actually happens. I welcome any thoughts / comments!

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Re: Rampage Update 2017

Postby DSR » Mon Jun 26, 2017 6:25 pm

..... And I can definitely understand the advantages of a semi-V hull like the Rampage when the water gets rough also....... :D

I have a little bit of experience with the engine stuff so I'd be happy to help if I can.

Usually the 496 is the best bang for the buck being that it typically costs the same to build as a 454 but sometimes it's not the best choice depending on the hardware you have to work with.....
Do you have any sort of budget target that you've pinned down for the engine?
Do you have anything to start with? And how mild or wild do you want to go?
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Denon Osterman
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Re: Rampage Update 2017

Postby Denon Osterman » Tue Jul 04, 2017 2:32 pm

Hi All,

Well, not as productive a long weekend (Canada celebrated it's 150th) as I'd hoped...too much relaxing! I did get some more work done on the floors, and I ended making a spur of the moment decision that's pretty major with regards to the whole boat. I also got all of my jet pump stuff in to finish installation, which is very exciting.

Stupidly, I also forgot my camera...so I only managed to get one photo with my cell phone. Consider it a teaser for the "major decision"...though unfortunately I don't have any prize for whoever guesses what the picture was, and therefore what the decision was!

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Should have much, much more progress on the floor decking and transom at the end of next weekend...but it IS the boatshow in Muskoka so I'll be taking a pretty significant part of Saturday off to go look at some beautiful boats! I'll post pictures here on that regardless.



RE: Dave's comments, I'm leaning towards the 496 as well. What do you mean by "hardware you have to work with"? My target budget is anything cheaper than a 502 GMPP crate engine, but with more performance and longevity. Nothing to start with but I would not trust myself to build the short block, just adding everything else. In terms of mild to wild I need (91) pump gas, would like it to start and idle relatively normal, and am concerned with water reversion on the cam profile (I'll be running wet headers). Otherwise, as wild as possible! PM me if you'd like to help? I'm generally at the stage where I know the basics, i.e. how cam profile head size and flow, intake style, etc affect things...but not educated enough yet to do everything. But, I've got another year to learn...and I'd like to think I'm a quick learner! Will be running off a 4 port thermostat for sure, and most likely using 4" lightning water jacketed headers with both Centek mufflers and slip in silencers of some form (my lake is not very friendly, at all, to noise)...but don't want to loose any power. I'd go with 3" Glenwood headers / risers, mufflers and silencers, but I'm very worried that will reduce the power I'm trying to get out significantly. I'd *like* to get 650 hp, but would be happy with 550-600. Will be hoping to turn an AA impeller at least 5200 rpm.

Thanks all, and happy Canada Day / Fourth of July to everyone :)

Denon

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Mr Hot Rod
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Re: Rampage Update 2017

Postby Mr Hot Rod » Tue Jul 04, 2017 9:34 pm

Here's a local engine rebuilder who may be able to set you up with a cost effective engine :

Edit : Another supplier :

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mrintense
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Re: Rampage Update 2017

Postby mrintense » Fri Jul 07, 2017 6:01 am

I had to do a double take when I saw how much HP you were talking about. Man, she is going to be a screamer! I don't have the nerve to go that fast on water. When I went out with Skip in his Mahalini last year and we accelerated it was as fast as I wanted to go!

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9s9IiNh__XA
Carl
a.k.a. Clipper

Crafting a classically styled Vera Cruise named "Some Other Time"

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Denon Osterman
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Re: Rampage Update 2017

Postby Denon Osterman » Fri Jul 07, 2017 2:52 pm

Hey guys, a few quick responses before I get to work for the weekend -

@Paul, thanks for the heads up! I'd already contacted Bullet through a friend and it seemed they were mostly focused on TurnKey sterndrive engines (and expensive ones at that...I was quoted 14k for a 496!). As they vary quite a bit from what a jet engine needs I'm not sure it's the best approach. Crosstown seems worth looking into though depending on prices it might be just as effective to build new from scratch, unless they have a block that suits what I'm looking for already. I'm not in a huge rush given I don't even have the decking on, but I didn't see a single big block when I clicked the link. Either way, thank you for the heads up! If nothing else it seems like they know what they're doing and could be helpful in getting started, or getting me a restored short block :)

@Carl, I'm definitely erring on the "safe" side - I might never use all 600hp! But jets are a totally different beast than straight props...much, much more suited to acceleration than top speed. And while the rampage is only listed as 750-800...well, mine will be a bit heavier. Based on my modifications (taller, wider, longer) and reinforcement (effectively went "up one size" on nearly everything), it will be close to double that. That's a 1500 lb hull, before engine, driver, fuel, etc. All in it will be closer to 2500...which, with a 600 hp engine, is a roughly 4:1 ratio of weight/SHP. Given Glen-l's chart here: http://www.glen-l.com/how-fast/ that should put me right around 70 mph...which is right where I want to be :) - not for normal driving, of course, but I'd like to have something that never, ever leaves me wanting for more.

My next update will likely be a separate post from the ACBS show this Saturday, followed on Monday or Tuesday with one from my progress this weekend...so last chance to guess at the past week's picture if anyone feels lucky!

Thanks,

Denon

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Mr Hot Rod
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Re: Rampage Update 2017

Postby Mr Hot Rod » Sat Jul 08, 2017 11:47 pm

Denon Osterman wrote:... but I didn't see a single big block when I clicked the link.

The first link is to Crosstown Engine's Home Page.

You might have missed it, but the second link is a direct link to their marine engines . 3 Big Blocks are listed :

    • GM 454 7.4 L / $ 3450
    • MERCURY H/O 425HP / 8.1 L / $ 6500
    • GM 502 8.2 L / $ 5500
I'd give them a call for more info.

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Re: Rampage Update 2017

Postby Denon Osterman » Mon Jul 10, 2017 10:06 pm

Oops, I think I missed the Marine link - thanks Paul! I'll give them a call for sure.

Finally got some good photos done this week showing progress from last week and this week. First off, some new hardware...then the final floors, and then the big reveal on last weeks teaser!

Here's the new jet pump steering nozzle - the old one is on the left, and the new one is on the right. The new one adds a low speed turning fin, but most importantly by far...trim! I splurged for the hydraulic as it was only a few hundred more than the manual, and I'd rather have a pump do the bending so I can change it at speed without having to buy extra cables and shifters (which lessen the price gap even more). No pic of the trim pump and steering hardware I got yet, but I'm already pretty excited with how everything looks.

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Another shot, showing how far "up" the nozzle can trim. In this case up is to the left, opposite the turning fin. The hydraulic pump is that silver thing in the top left. And the grey angle sticking out the top and slightly to the right is to hold the shift cable.

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Onto the floor. It's nearly done - I just need to add little "legs" to the corners near the stringers, where the floors are floating in the air. In other words, the "middle" section are only resting on the frame members right now, and need to get four more legs to hold them up. The "Left" and "Right" sections are fully supported by the chine on the outboard side, but also need legs on the inboard side where they're a few inches off the actual hull.

The following three pictures show how the "back side" panels are supported...a flat in the doubled chine behind the frame member, and a little ledge in front of the chine (where it's no longer doubled and, therefore, does not stick as far out). If I'd known I was going to run into this trouble when I first butt joined the chines many years ago, I would have chosen a different place...but alas, here we are!

The whole mounting area:

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The front ledge, note the single chine:

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And the rear flattened area, note the double chine negating the need for the ledge:

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For the front side sections, I didn't have to deal with the double chine issue, which allowed me to rest the actual floor slats (instead of the longitudinal member) directly on a flattened chine. This means they're nearly perfectly level, whereas the rear side floors have a 2-3 degree angle to them. Note the slats resting right on a (flattened) section of the chine below:

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And now, the moment you've all been waiting for...the finished floors! Again they still need to be encapsulated and varnished, and they need little legs...but this is pretty much exactly how they'll look when done, minus the shiny-ness.

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Last but not least, this week's "progress shot"...not much of a difference, but it does have the floors mocked in.

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And now...drumroll please...the big reveal from last week!

There's a minor story here - I'd left off on sanding the transom because I'd wanted to finish it with the top deck. However, my girlfriend was looking to help so I was thinking that getting it leveled and giving it a fresh coat would be a good way to get her to assist. Unfortunately, when she did, I realized I'd really messed up on the transom...and had clearly not wetted out the cloth properly (the weave was very visible, and not pretty!). I did some thinking and decided to make a bit of a change. I'd always thought it might be nice to have a "raw" transom and the rest of the boat finished, and now - thanks to an entire weekend of planning and sanding - I do! Getting all of the fiberglass and epoxy off took *forever*, and I was physically very sore from all of the sanding and planning to get it all off. It nearly filled my shop vac! But I think the results are well worth it. Without further ado - the new transom!

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In the following view you can really see where the veneer disappears - I'll still be painting everything below that black line. And, it becomes more clear what last weeks photo was...those holes in the middle! The triangle with the large hole in the middle on the left is the steering tube, followed by the shifting cable, followed by the two hydraulic lines. In most cases the holes have been drilled oversize as my hardware would not through bolt such a thick transom, so I'll be filling the holes with epoxy and bolting into that for added strength...after all, this is what's controlling my boat!

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Here's another shot showing how it contrasts with the side. The top deck will also be darkly stained with just the white ash pin stripes - one around the perimeter on each side, and one running directly over the stringer on each side (which will align exactly with the ones currently on the sides at the bow of the boat). I really like the contrast between the sides and transom!

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Last but not least, a horribly blurry and close up shot of the transom. The colour is terrible, but at least it shows that the stain stayed in a few particularly deep spots of grain, and in the raptor fastenings. Both of these lead to a more rustic, rough and unfinished look to the transom, which I'm very fond of! It might not be the glitz and glam of some other boats, but I think it will be a beautiful contrast to the rest of the boat, and still looks mighty fine all on it's own...once the epoxy and varnish get finished and some lettering and hardware gets installed, it should be great!

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That's it for now - thanks everyone!

Denon


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