modified malahini

Designs for inboard or outboard power

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BayouBengal
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Re: modified malahini

Postby BayouBengal » Mon Aug 21, 2017 8:34 pm

Started with 60 grit. Drew pencil marks over entire boat. With long board against grain did 45 degrees to right until pencil marks gone, then 45 degrees to left removing next set of pencil marks. Finally 60 grit with the grain removing another set of pencil marks. Left plywood at this stage and only worked on sapale boards on sides, bow, and transom. Again using pencil marks to be sure I did entire surface, used 80, 100, 120 and lastly 150 grit with the grain. I was going to stop at 120, but I am using General Finishes gel stain and they say to sand to 150, so 150 it is. This was a very long tiring process. I need to find a power assisted way of doing this instead of a manual long board. I have also rounded the edges to prepare for fiberglass.


In my opinion, that's exactly how it should be done. Very nice concise description.

PeterG
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Re: modified malahini

Postby PeterG » Mon Aug 21, 2017 8:46 pm

I have a book by Don Danenberg on restoring mahogany runabouts. You are using the same process he describes for his restorations. Lots of work but the payoff is in the results you will get. I've been following your Malahini build for quite some time, glad to see your progress. I'm not so much looking forward to the sanding part. Though, I'm not doing topside planks like you have, I plan on installing a classic planked Chris Craft style deck just like Danenberg's restored Woodies get. Your hull looks great, I can't wait to see it stained and finished. Your sanding drudgery is basically done, a big accomishment. Keep posting and have fun!
Murphy's Law: Anything that can go wrong, will go wrong.
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DrBryanJ
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Re: modified malahini

Postby DrBryanJ » Tue Aug 22, 2017 4:20 am

Thanks Bayou and PeterG. Your replies make me feel much better.

As I am getting closer to epoxying the sides and painting the bottom, I have a few of questions. 1) What did everyone use to lay down coats of epoxy over the bright sides? 2) How many coats? I figure at least 2 maybe 3? 3) I am planning on using wr- lpu paint in a custom color. I want to order enough at one time. How much paint is needed?

By the way, I think I need to change my tag line. Lisa is kind of getting excited about the boat. At least she didn't hassle me as I labored over sanding instead of maintaining our yard. :lol: :lol:
Bryan

Building a malahini "Mona Lisa"

My wife said "If I build a boat, she's getting a divorce."

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mrintense
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Re: modified malahini

Postby mrintense » Tue Aug 22, 2017 6:32 am

Bryan,

I had great luck using the thin foam rollers for applying epoxy when I fiberglassed my hull bottom. What I liked about it was that the finish was fairly smooth compared to if I had spread it with a squeegee. I didn't use peel ply afterwards although that would have probably improved the finish even more. It still needed to be sanded but there was much less effort needed to get it smooth for the next application.

Of course like anything, please test this out on scrap before applying the technique to your boat. She looks great and all that hard work will pay off when you finally get her finished. I know it seems like it will be forever until that happens, believe me, I know that feeling. But I just keep telling myself that I need to enjoy the journey as well as the destination.

Looking forward to seeing the next phase of your build.
Carl
a.k.a. Clipper

Crafting a classically styled Vera Cruise named "Some Other Time"

Clipper's Vera Cruise Build

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DrBryanJ
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Re: modified malahini

Postby DrBryanJ » Tue Aug 22, 2017 6:58 am

Thanks Carl. How long did they last? How many did you go through?
Bryan

Building a malahini "Mona Lisa"

My wife said "If I build a boat, she's getting a divorce."

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BayouBengal
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Re: modified malahini

Postby BayouBengal » Tue Aug 22, 2017 8:04 am

1) What did everyone use to lay down coats of epoxy over the bright sides? 2) How many coats? I figure at least 2 maybe 3? 3) I am planning on using wr- lpu paint in a custom color. I want to order enough at one time. How much paint is needed?

1) Thin rollers
2) At least 4 or 5 coats of epoxy, block sanded lightly with 150 after every 2 to 3 coats.
3) You have to order a gallon minimum for custom colors, and a gallon should do it (presuming you're just painting below the waterline).

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mrintense
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Re: modified malahini

Postby mrintense » Tue Aug 22, 2017 10:14 am

DrBryanJ wrote:Thanks Carl. How long did they last? How many did you go through?


Each one was a one time use so you would need to find a source where the costs are low. Or do what I did and buy them as you need them. I would order 10 at a time so the order cost wasn't too expensive. It would have been more convenient to order more, but inc=variably, when I do this, I end up ordering too many and waste money.

So I needed on average 3 per section of fiberglass (one wet coat and two fill coats) spaced over several days. To improve productivity, I worked opposite ends and opposite sides of the boat so I could get two sections coated per day. On my boat, I believe it took four sections per side on the bottom and three per side on the sides. All of this was fiberglassed. If you are not glassing parts, then your roller use will probably be less, depending upon how many encapsulation coats you apply.

I am not sure you could get away with this, but perhaps a roller could be put in the freezer after a session and then removed prior to the next. This is definitely something you would want to test first. IN the heat we have here, even in the fall, this was not possible for me. The roller would be getting hot by the time I finished wetting out the cloth.
Carl
a.k.a. Clipper

Crafting a classically styled Vera Cruise named "Some Other Time"

Clipper's Vera Cruise Build

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hoodman
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Re: modified malahini

Postby hoodman » Tue Aug 22, 2017 10:56 am

I used the 7 inch rollers that Glen-l sells and some 9 inch 1/8" nap foam rollers from somewhere else. Both did a good job evenly distributing epoxy over the hull during the fiberglassing process. I did three coats of epoxy and went through about 10 rollers. When initially wetting out the cloth I used the yellow plastic scrapers to force the epoxy down into the cloth. Wetting out the cloth was the most time consuming step. You'll want to use a nice slow hardener and don't do it when it's hot out. If it is warm make sure to have a helper that can mix up several smaller batches for you. Took me a good 40 minutes to wet out each section. I did the bottom first in halves, then did the sides. I was working in December in NC so I had plenty of working time with the epoxy but wetting out the cloth takes so much epoxy that I had to do 2 to three batches. Filling the weave goes really quickly.

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DrBryanJ
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Re: modified malahini

Postby DrBryanJ » Tue Aug 22, 2017 11:27 am

Thanks everyone for your replies.

So plan of attack is: After cleaning garage of inches thick dust, clean hull with vacuum and surgical blue tack rags. Stain area to be left bright with General Finishes gel stain as shown in their video on staining large areas without lap marks. Let dry for at least one week, during which time I will continue to remove dust from garage. Next epoxy bright sides with 4-5 coats of epoxy using 7" foam rollers I just ordered from Glen-L, sanding after each second coat with 150 grit. Next fiberglass bottom to waterline. Going to do in two pieces (left and right) Fill weave. Haven't decided if I'll use peel ply or not. Back to sanding. Finally paint.

When I fiberglass, should I fill the weave on first side before applying second side, or apply both sides then fill weave? When I get to painting, I'll have more questions.

One other thing I have to do: when I was sanding, I think I loosened my building form and the boat is not level. I'm going to have to climb under and check. If necessary, I'll re-level.
Bryan

Building a malahini "Mona Lisa"

My wife said "If I build a boat, she's getting a divorce."

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BayouBengal
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Re: modified malahini

Postby BayouBengal » Tue Aug 22, 2017 12:14 pm

I'm only recommending the 4 to 5 coats on the planked sides that you're not glassing. You certainly don't need to spread that much on the sections that you'll be filling the weave with a squeegee.

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DrBryanJ
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Re: modified malahini

Postby DrBryanJ » Tue Aug 22, 2017 12:21 pm

Thanks Bayou. I understood that. On fiberglass only need enough to fill the weave.
Bryan

Building a malahini "Mona Lisa"

My wife said "If I build a boat, she's getting a divorce."

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mrintense
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Re: modified malahini

Postby mrintense » Tue Aug 22, 2017 3:32 pm

When you glass the bottom, you are going to need to feather sand the overlap area so you'll probably want to do a wet out and first fill, then feather sand, apply the second side the same way and smooth sand, then do a final fill coat over the entire hull for an even finish. Depending upon how aggressive your sanding is, you might need a fourth overall coat. I would also suggest a finer grit on the last layers. I think I used 220 on the last layer before paint.

I might also suggest that you do the bottom first, then do the sides. This is again because you are going to want to feather sand where the glass overlaps the sides (assuming you are going to do that). Also, doing the bottom is going to be messy so leave the sides for afterwards.
Carl
a.k.a. Clipper

Crafting a classically styled Vera Cruise named "Some Other Time"

Clipper's Vera Cruise Build

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Ibrew2be
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Re: modified malahini

Postby Ibrew2be » Tue Aug 22, 2017 6:37 pm

Bryan:
I'd add one thing to the good advice you've received from others. I found that when applying epoxy to a non-horizontal surface that I needed to be very careful to keep the coats pretty thin, otherwise there is a real risk of the epoxy running or "curtaining". Unlike paint, epoxy doesn't have any thixotrope in it, so it's more susceptible to this kind of problem.

Love the way your planked hull looks, BTW.

Barry
Barry Shantz

Imp built and launched. Thinking hard about Boat 2.0

bobinpowayca
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Re: modified malahini

Postby bobinpowayca » Tue Aug 22, 2017 7:38 pm

Barry, just following this post and have a related issue. I got the rolling and tipping down pretty good on my hull with two-part polyester urethane (Awlgrip) and didn't have any "curtain" issues on the vertical surfaces (hull was upside down). But I do have the "curtaining" problem with varnish - specifically, rolling and tipping my mahogany dashboard and coamings. No matter how careful I am. So I'm thinking the epifanes varnish doesn't have the thixotropic (?) quality of the paint as you say. I think I will forget about rolling and tipping the vertical brightwork and instead see how smooth a job I can do with a badger hair brush. Any thoughts on applying varnish? Thanks, Bob
Bob
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Ibrew2be
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Re: modified malahini

Postby Ibrew2be » Wed Aug 23, 2017 5:03 pm

Bob:
I had a lot of curtaining challenges when I used Epifanes varnish as well. It doesn't have any thixotrope in it, either. One thing I tried that I had some success with was to keep the varnish thinned. As I recall, the instructions said that you only needed to thin the varnish on the first coat, and then could move to using the varnish undiluted. My logic with thinning it was that the solvent would flash off pretty quickly, and in the process, I'd be putting down less actual varnish per unit volume applied. So I diluted by 25% or so for all of the applications I did. And of course, I rolled on the thinnest coat I could manage.

Barry
Barry Shantz

Imp built and launched. Thinking hard about Boat 2.0


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