CNC Conversion

A forum for contacting other builders of Ken Hankinson designs. These designs are now a part of the Glen-L family.

Moderators: Bill Edmundson, billy c

Alan71
Posts: 8
Joined: Sun Jan 06, 2019 6:39 am

Re: CNC Conversion

Post by Alan71 » Tue May 21, 2019 7:16 am

Hello,

I'd like to add to the CNC discussion.

I'm in the early stages of attempting to build a small gentleman's runabout.
The boat I envision is similar to a Garwood Speedster 16 and a Hacker Gentleman's Racer 16 as drawn by Nelson Zimmer.

I have no wood working experience, no boat building experience, and no real boating experience.
I bought plans for the framing from Classic Wooden Boat Plans in Australia . They are in pdf format. Chesapeake Light Craft in Annapolis cut the parts using their CNC equipment. So far it appears that the ring frames, floors and stem have turned out very well.

To this point I'm using mahogany for parts other than the frames, floors and stem. I'm getting ready to install the chines, sheers and battens.
It appears I'm quite a wood butcher so the learning cure is extremely steep.

I am using this site for information by going far back in various build threads looking for folk's experience and guidance. I certainly can see the advantage of buying a set of plans from Glen L. and why the plans are held in such high regard.

A photo from this a.m. .

Regards,
Alan71
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TomB
Posts: 622
Joined: Wed Jan 18, 2017 4:07 pm
Location: Holland, MI

Re: CNC Conversion

Post by TomB » Wed May 22, 2019 7:04 pm

Welcome Alan,

You've picked a beautiful design to build.

Best luck,

Tom

Hercdrvr
Posts: 947
Joined: Mon May 11, 2015 12:52 pm
Location: McKinney TX

Re: CNC Conversion

Post by Hercdrvr » Wed May 22, 2019 7:29 pm

Beautiful boat you have started, the keel beam is massive. How do you keep your boat shop so tidy?
Matt B

Alan71
Posts: 8
Joined: Sun Jan 06, 2019 6:39 am

Re: CNC Conversion

Post by Alan71 » Thu May 23, 2019 4:44 am

Hi Tom,
I'm quite smitten with the design of the speedster/gentlemen's racer type boat .

My wife and I have spent time in Manistee in a cottage on Lake Michigan each summer for many, many years. We'll be headed there in a couple of weeks.

One of the folks (Mike Tuesink) who started The Wooden Runabout in Holland is a cousin to my wife. It was through their website that I first learned about using cnc technology for building small wooden boats.

I really have no idea what I'm doing so spend lots of time going through threads like yours!

Regards,
Alan

Alan71
Posts: 8
Joined: Sun Jan 06, 2019 6:39 am

Re: CNC Conversion

Post by Alan71 » Thu May 23, 2019 5:30 am

Hello Matt,

The keel is 2" thick and 3-1/2" wide. It's begins to taper at about frame #3. (On this plan the frames are numbered from stem to stern.)
The keel is laminated from 4 1/2" thick pieces of mahogany and each lamination has a single scarf, the position of the scarf varies in each of them. I didn't want the scarfs to create a 'hard spot' in the curve of the keel by having them occur at the same location.
The engine stringers are pretty serious too. They're also mahogany and taper from about 5" in the front to about 3" in the rear, and are 1-7/8" thick. I made each from 2 lengths scarfed together.

Tidy!?!
I find a neat work area helps when I really don't have much of an idea of what I'm doing. I guess maybe I need all the 'focus' I can muster?
Plus, since the shop is in our basement I need to be quite careful about controlling saw dust. My wife encouraged me to close off part of the basement for the shop and that's what I did before starting work on the boat.

I often look at your building thread for help.
I wasn't sure about your on-line name until until I saw the photo on the wall behind you in that photo of you looking over the new plans.
I have a friend who is a 'busdriver'.

Regards,
Alan

Another view of the shop.
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TomB
Posts: 622
Joined: Wed Jan 18, 2017 4:07 pm
Location: Holland, MI

Re: CNC Conversion

Post by TomB » Thu May 23, 2019 6:58 am

Alan,

I've met Mike, nice fellow. Their shop is about 5 miles from my basement boat shop. Like you, I made promises to my wife about dust, noise, etc. I've been a good boy, mostly. One bit of advice, the finishes smell bad for days, figure out a way to evacuate the stink. Sealing between floors won't be enough :oops: :oops:

Tom

Alan71
Posts: 8
Joined: Sun Jan 06, 2019 6:39 am

Re: CNC Conversion

Post by Alan71 » Wed Jun 05, 2019 1:42 pm

Hello,

A photo showing a bit of progress.

It appears as though the notches with limbers have been well located in the pdf and that CLC did a nice job cutting them.
The material for the sheers, chines, and battens is mahogany. It seems to be very nice and is even a bit forgiving as I struggle to work with it.
Just learning how to use a plane well continues to reveal itself slowly.

My wife and I are going away for a few weeks so it'll be a while before I return to working on this boat.

Regards,
Alan

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billy c
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Location: NH
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Re: CNC Conversion

Post by billy c » Fri Jun 07, 2019 4:55 am

Alan-
Thanks for your posts.
Just when I thought that there were enough projects to work on. :D
...Miss Behave drawings and offsets have been hanging on the shop wall for awhile. It looks like CLC did a great job cutting from the PDF file you provided?
Any thoughts on what you are going to run for power for your project?
Billy
(insert Witty phrase here)
Billy's Belle Isle website

Alan71
Posts: 8
Joined: Sun Jan 06, 2019 6:39 am

Re: CNC Conversion

Post by Alan71 » Sat Jun 08, 2019 8:08 am

Hello Billy,
The designer at CLC took the cutting information on the pdf and 'nested' the frames, floors, and stem pieces on just 3 sheets of 18mm okume.
It seemed to be quite easy for him and I was pretty amazed with his work. (I would have thought.... maybe 5 or 6 sheets?.)

The engine.... that's an interesting question....
Originally in the 30s these small runabouts appear to have had small 4 & 6 cylinder engines like the ChrisCraft, Grey Marine, and Chrysler marine engines.
At this point I'm looking for a 6 cylinder version of one of those engines from the 50s when they had around 130 horsepower. There are a few sources for rebuilt engines and transmissions from this era.

I have the Garwood Miss Behave redrawn plans from the museum in Clayton and the Hacker Gentlemen's Racer plans from Wooden Boat Magazine. I'll repeat what I posted earlier... I wish these plans contained the amount of information that I gather the Glen-L plans have.
I added 1-1/2" between each frame so the boat I'm trying to build will be 17 feet rather than 16 feet. If I had known how easy the stretch would work out I'd have made it 2inches between each frame. I like the stretched look some of these boats have. Google the VanDam boat 'Big Mouth Charlie'... I think it's proportions are just about ideal, but it's a boat far beyond my means or ability.

Regards,
Alan

Alan71
Posts: 8
Joined: Sun Jan 06, 2019 6:39 am

Re: CNC Conversion

Post by Alan71 » Fri Aug 02, 2019 6:52 am

Hello,

I was away for the month of June but started working on the boat again after the 4th of July.

I've mainly worked on shaping the keel and chines and also on beveling the frames and frame notches to seat the stringers and battens.
The location of the notches in the frames seems to be right on except for one notch in frame 1 that needed to be slid about 1/2" in order to obtain a fairer 'sweep' for the stringer. The starboard side chine and stringers are epoxied in place.

So at least to this point the CNC data seems good.

Learning to use a plane 'competently' continues to be a challenge.

Regards,
Alan
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Alan71
Posts: 8
Joined: Sun Jan 06, 2019 6:39 am

Re: CNC Conversion

Post by Alan71 » Sun Sep 08, 2019 7:51 am

Hello,
Another up-date.

I've been working on beveling all the notches for the bottom and top-side stringers/battens and also beveling the frames. I've also cut rabbits in the stem for the sheers and chines and for the battens/stringers. Everything is epoxied in place now and the frames are also bolted to the keel and stem. The transom is bolted/epoxied to the engine stringers too. It's gone well.

The bevels on the 1st and 2nd frames are pretty severe since the bow of this runabout is pretty 'pointy'. In looking at the info on the "Wooden Runabout" site it appears that they may be set up to use their CNC equipment to set the bevels on the frames and notches. If so that's a pretty nice thing to be able to do.

In conclusion I think that starting out with CNC cut parts is a good idea. It results in very accurate frames and gets the project going a little quicker.

Regards,
Alan
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