Michigan Squirt Build

Outboard designs up to 14'

Moderator: ttownshaw

BillW
Posts: 148
Joined: Sun Oct 05, 2008 8:03 am
Location: Seattle, WA

Re: Michigan Squirt Build

Post by BillW » Sun Oct 16, 2016 9:10 am

If you need a new decal for that control box, you can get it from http://www.nymarine.ca
Looks like you are doing a great job on the Squirt.

Bill

User avatar
chugalug
Posts: 1316
Joined: Sat Nov 29, 2014 5:01 pm
Location: top of mn.

Re: Michigan Squirt Build

Post by chugalug » Sun Oct 16, 2016 9:22 am

:D That shifter looks a little older than the one I plan on using on Chug-A -Lug
IMG_0880[1].JPG
Though the motor is an Evenrude :D
Working on regular-sized Bo-Jest


"If it's not crooked,It's not mine

JimmY
Posts: 876
Joined: Sat Jul 30, 2016 11:08 am
Location: Brighton, MI

Re: Michigan Squirt Build

Post by JimmY » Mon Oct 17, 2016 2:39 pm

Hi Guys,

I've seen the site you mentioned, Bill, and already talked to the owner(but thanks for posting about it. It is a great site). I'm trying to figure out if I can handle the Squirt build AND restoring my outboard. The big problem with the outboard is that the timing is a bit critical once you sandblast the aluminum. You're got to get the primer on in a few days and the paint on top of the primer within a day or you need to sand. I've got a friend with a paint booth, so it's a matter of finding a time(and funds) to do it.

Chug, that will look great on your boat. They may have made an evinrude version of that controller. Check the site Bill mentioned, and you might be able to repaint it and get new decals. They sell matching paint in rattle cans for small jobs like that.

Dave, I plan to some vacuum bagging on this build as well. What kind of pump and setup do you have?
-Jim
Nothing says poor craftsmanship like wrinkles in your duct tape!

DSR
Posts: 274
Joined: Mon Mar 21, 2016 8:11 pm
Location: Allegan, Michigan

Re: Michigan Squirt Build

Post by DSR » Mon Oct 17, 2016 6:19 pm

Hi Jim,

I'm collecting pieces to build a vacuum-bag setup. A buddy of mine picked up a brand new fridge pump in the box for $20 that works like a charm and I've got a couple adjustable vacuum/electrical switches, a couple gauges and some nylon air line laying around here (somewhere..... :roll: ....)
I was going to try a 2-stage setup with one of the vacs that I use for my flow bench. I've never tried vacuum-bagging but for some of the lams I'm doing on the TNT, along with the sheathing, it doesn't make sense not to bag it.
It sounds like you have experience with this and I'd love to pick your brain on it sometime if you don't mind. :D

Thanks!
DSR Performance - Home of yet another jet TNT build :D
Codename "Just A Little....."
viewtopic.php?f=23&t=29753

JimmY
Posts: 876
Joined: Sat Jul 30, 2016 11:08 am
Location: Brighton, MI

Peel-ply part 2

Post by JimmY » Sun Oct 23, 2016 6:24 am

I was traveling for my day job last week and got back on Friday afternoon. I ripped off the peel-ply and it worked great. It left a nice smooth, matt surface. On the transom I only used peel-ply on the framing members and not on the plywood between the frames. Using 80 grit on my sander, I leveled out the epoxy with a little elbow grease. I didn't use peel-ply on the stem either, and the roller left a few bubbles, dust nibs, and orange peel, so it will take a bit of work to level it out. On the peel-ply surfaces all they needed was a quick pass with the sander. Overall I think the peel-ply is a time saver.
20161022_124334.jpg
I flipped the frames and started encapsulating the other side. Applied the second coat and peel-ply Saturday morning and ripped it off Saturday night. You can see where the peel-ply didn't get around some of the corners, but cleaning up these little spots is a lot easier than scuffing the whole frame.
20161023_074046.jpg
The tape on the edges is another story. It required scraping it off with a hobby knife, but my edges are clean. I'm not sure if this is a time saver or not. If you are neat with applying the epoxy, it is probably not necessary. If you have a better type of tape, it may be easier to remove.
20161023_082741.jpg
I experimented on the transom knee with brushing on the 3rd coat of epoxy, and the result was very smooth and level. So, going forward I'm going to roll on the 1st and 2nd coat of epoxy with peel-ply on top of the 2nd, and finish off the 3rd coat with a brush.

Dave (DSR) and his son stopped by Saturday afternoon to pick up the extra 1/2 sheet of Okoume plywood that I had. I was nice meeting a fellow builder and talking shop for a bit. Again, I can't say enough about the great community here on the forum.

I'm going to go over each frame once more with the sander (220 grit), and then start mounting them to the building form. It looks like builders are screwing the frames to the form. It seems a shame to drill through the encapsulation, but I guess you can epoxy fill these holes after it is removed. Any other options out there?

Later,
-Jim
Nothing says poor craftsmanship like wrinkles in your duct tape!

BillW
Posts: 148
Joined: Sun Oct 05, 2008 8:03 am
Location: Seattle, WA

Re: Michigan Squirt Build

Post by BillW » Sun Oct 23, 2016 5:33 pm

JimmY,
I, also, did not want to drill thru the frames for mounting to the building jig. So I did it like this.
The Squirt is so small that the forces applied when bending the chines & shears are not very great;
the c-clamps held just fine for me.

Just check the c-clamps occasionally as you progress. But, if you do decide to use screws, be sure all
the screws can be reached with a screwdriver when finished....

That is actually not a Glen-L boat in this picture. Oops. I didn't have a digital camera back when I built the Squirt.
I hope Gayle doesn't kick me off the site for this indiscretion.....honest, I did build a Glen-L boat.
Bill
DSCN0234 (2).JPG

User avatar
BarnacleMike
Posts: 1139
Joined: Wed Sep 21, 2011 7:47 am
Location: North Georgia / Chattanooga Area
Contact:

Re: Peel-ply part 2

Post by BarnacleMike » Mon Oct 24, 2016 8:06 am

JimmY wrote:It looks like builders are screwing the frames to the form. It seems a shame to drill through the encapsulation, but I guess you can epoxy fill these holes after it is removed. Any other options out there?
JimmY,

When building my Utility, I didn't want to screw the frames to the form either... for basically the same reason. So, I tightly clamped the frames to the form in as many locations as I could.

However, in spite of this, I eventually realized that some of the frames were indeed shifting. In the end, I wound up screwing at least one of the frames to the form, anyway. In retrospect, I wish I had done it that way to start with. I will certainly be screwing my frames to the form with the Zip.

Drilling holes in the frames seems like a big deal at this stage of the build, but by the time it's flipped and you're finishing out the interior, it really is not. As you mentioned, it's just a matter of filling the holes with epoxy, and finishing it however you please.
"How long does it take to build a boat? Until it's finished" — yours truly
Why did the boatbuilder get a divorce? Because he didn't have enough clamps to hold his marriage together!

hoodman
Posts: 2260
Joined: Thu Nov 10, 2011 8:48 am
Location: Lafayette, IN

Re: Michigan Squirt Build

Post by hoodman » Mon Oct 24, 2016 3:10 pm

Yup, secure the frames with screws. If it shifts while your bending something and you don't realize you could get into trouble real quickly.
Matt

Building a Geronimo......!
viewtopic.php?f=2&t=25139

JimmY
Posts: 876
Joined: Sat Jul 30, 2016 11:08 am
Location: Brighton, MI

Setup

Post by JimmY » Fri Oct 28, 2016 9:48 am

Hi,

We'll I've taken all your advice into account, and have used a combination of clamps and screws to secure the frames to the building form. I've spent a few evenings aligning the frames, and I think I have it a straight as it is going to get.

I don't have a laser level, or a decent level to speak of, so I need to get creative to get the job done. My one 2' level was not reading the same when I turned it around on my workbench. I have a variety of smaller levels, so I found one that was accurate and paired it with a "v" shaped straight edge that I have. To align the center of the frames, I used a string with nails in the center of the transom and breast hook. With Frame 2 screwed and leveled to the building form, I leveled and clamped the transom to the form. I then clamped a level vertically to Frame 2 at the centerline and used the string to align the stem and breast hook. I cut a piece of plywood and secured it to a 2x4 that is bolted to the floor of my shop to support the breast hook.
20161023_174150.jpg
20161023_174137.jpg
20161023_174129.jpg
While this is not the most elegant way of aligning your frames, it can be done with a minimum of technology.
Last edited by JimmY on Fri Oct 28, 2016 10:09 am, edited 1 time in total.
-Jim
Nothing says poor craftsmanship like wrinkles in your duct tape!

JimmY
Posts: 876
Joined: Sat Jul 30, 2016 11:08 am
Location: Brighton, MI

Setup

Post by JimmY » Fri Oct 28, 2016 9:50 am

With the transom, frame 2, and the stem aligned I fit the keel to the transom and knee and cut it to length.
20161023_120430.jpg
20161023_120535.jpg
With the keel bolted in place, I needed to adjust the angle of the transom to get it to lay flat across the frames. This was a bit of an iterative process with constant checking that the transom was still square to frame 2. I measured from all the sheer and chine notches to the transom and made sure everything was even. I found a old 6' long metal bracket form a closet system I install a few year back, and it proved a good straight edge for straightening the keel. The next thing was aligning frame 1, and I used the keel and the straight edge to center it, and leveled it to frame 2 and the transom. The scrap wood securing frame 1 are wrapped in packing tape so they don't become permanent additions to the boat. In fact, anywhere the frames touch the form there is packing tape.

When I cut the stem, I thought this was going to be a problem but I did it anyway. The cutout in the stem for the keel follows the contour of the stem and would require the keel to be bent from frame 2 forward. The problem is this would cause a bow between frame 2 and frame 1 and a valley between frame 1 and the transom, and there would be no way to level it out. I thought about adding so wedges, but not sure if this is right or not.
20161027_213346.jpg
Any other Squirt builder have this problem? Would another option be to cut a kerf across the keel to allow it to bend easier?
Last edited by JimmY on Fri Oct 28, 2016 2:39 pm, edited 2 times in total.
-Jim
Nothing says poor craftsmanship like wrinkles in your duct tape!

JimmY
Posts: 876
Joined: Sat Jul 30, 2016 11:08 am
Location: Brighton, MI

Final setup

Post by JimmY » Fri Oct 28, 2016 10:08 am

And the final setup. I should get the keel epoxied in place this weekend, and plan on attaching the sheers next (vs. chines).

I think attaching the knee to the transom first helped in aligning the frames and keel, so I recommend this deviation from the construction sequence.
20161027_213335.jpg
GO BLUE!
-Jim
Nothing says poor craftsmanship like wrinkles in your duct tape!

User avatar
BarnacleMike
Posts: 1139
Joined: Wed Sep 21, 2011 7:47 am
Location: North Georgia / Chattanooga Area
Contact:

Re: Michigan Squirt Build

Post by BarnacleMike » Fri Oct 28, 2016 10:12 am

Jim,

I believe that you had the keel notch in the stem correct the first time. I haven't double-checked my squirt plans, but I'm almost positive that the keel does indeed bend downward into the stem notch.

The issue of dealing with the resulting "bump" in the aft section of the keel is a pretty common topic here on the forum, especially with the Squirt, as I recall.

Similarly, the keel for the Zip ALSO bends downward into the stem notch. I believe that's also the case with the Malahini and quite a few of Glen's designs.
"How long does it take to build a boat? Until it's finished" — yours truly
Why did the boatbuilder get a divorce? Because he didn't have enough clamps to hold his marriage together!

User avatar
BarnacleMike
Posts: 1139
Joined: Wed Sep 21, 2011 7:47 am
Location: North Georgia / Chattanooga Area
Contact:

Re: Michigan Squirt Build

Post by BarnacleMike » Fri Oct 28, 2016 10:16 am

Jim,

Here's a link to a forum thread that deals with this very issue on the Squirt:

viewtopic.php?f=17&t=13800&hilit=Bend+squirt+keel
"How long does it take to build a boat? Until it's finished" — yours truly
Why did the boatbuilder get a divorce? Because he didn't have enough clamps to hold his marriage together!

hoodman
Posts: 2260
Joined: Thu Nov 10, 2011 8:48 am
Location: Lafayette, IN

Re: Michigan Squirt Build

Post by hoodman » Fri Oct 28, 2016 11:13 am

Mike is right, the keel on most of these boats is curved as it goes into the stem. As long as you are flat in the aft 1/3 of the boat you should be good, that is your planing surface.
Matt

Building a Geronimo......!
viewtopic.php?f=2&t=25139

Benj269
Posts: 65
Joined: Wed Aug 20, 2014 8:03 am

Re: Michigan Squirt Build

Post by Benj269 » Fri Oct 28, 2016 11:44 am

Mine lined up the same and led to a bit of confusion and adjusting of the stem/breasthook up and down. In the end it is about 3/8" of a bend at the end of the keel. I don't have any good pictures with the keel in place, but I also tapered the keel between frame 1 and the stem so bending the keel is really easy and puts less of a bow between 1 and 2 (I tapered the width, not thickness). The problem I had (and still have) is that when I got the stem/breasthook at the right height/angle, F1 isn't quite plumb. The sheer ends tip back about 1/8". I probably did something wrong, but since I had glued and screwed the stem to F1 already, I couldn't easily correct it.

I happened to have a picture of the stem angle:
Photo Oct 11, 9 15 57 PM.jpg

Post Reply

Return to “Small outboards”