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Re: Fisherman

Posted: Thu Mar 14, 2019 6:33 pm
by epiziali
This is what sheer will look like when I clamp tight

Re: Fisherman

Posted: Fri Mar 15, 2019 12:48 am
by hoodman
Looks money to me.

Re: Fisherman

Posted: Fri Mar 15, 2019 5:39 am
by 283
epiziali wrote:
Thu Mar 14, 2019 6:30 pm
Pic of gap
Hard to say from looking at pics. But I think a shim added to fill that gap is a good idea...if it isn’t it’s easy to to plane it back off.


...Looking good.

Re: Fisherman

Posted: Fri Mar 15, 2019 6:07 am
by TomB
Take a step back and get a long look at the chine and the sheer. Sight down them from several angles. If they have a smooth curve, and twist, without humps or dips, its time for a happy dance. :D :D :D Tom

Re: Fisherman

Posted: Fri Mar 15, 2019 6:18 am
by DrBryanJ
From the pic it looks like you could use a shim, but sight down the side to see what you have. For some reason, looking with your head upside down actually helps see the deformities more easily.

Re: Fisherman

Posted: Fri Mar 15, 2019 9:52 am
by epiziali
First I'm gonna shim, then I'm gonna dance, might even do the shimmy. Thanks guys!

Re: Fisherman

Posted: Sat Mar 16, 2019 10:09 am
by epiziali
Finding okoume in northern cal is proving difficult. I found a local supplier with marine grade meranti 1088. Anyone have experience with meranti?

Re: Fisherman

Posted: Sat Mar 16, 2019 10:50 am
by Bill Edmundson
epi

My Bartender is all Meranti. It is a little heavier. You may need to plan your exposed cut so the blade enters on the "good" side. It tends to splinter. It's good though. It is supposed to be a little more rot resistant.

Bill

Re: Fisherman

Posted: Sat Mar 16, 2019 12:16 pm
by TomB
I'm using Meranti. It splinters and is a little stiffer than Meranti. Tom

Re: Fisherman

Posted: Sat Mar 16, 2019 5:24 pm
by Otter
+1 on the splintering.
I'm also using meranti, mostly because I like the color and grain better than Okoume. and it is cheaper
I badly splintered a few of the frame gussets (no big deal in those, will be a bigger deal when I get to planking) but eventually figured out a couple of days to minimize the splintering.
1. as suggested in earlier post, make sure entry side of saw tooth is on "good" side of plywood
2. use finer tooth blade
3. place masking tape over saw line prior to sawing

Doing all three of those has helped decrease my splintering significantly.

Re: Fisherman

Posted: Sun Mar 17, 2019 10:27 am
by PeterG
Sounds like you have the meranti figured out! I used meranti for all of my flat pieces like transom, motorboard, gussets, stem, etc. I found your cutting methods most helpful. One other suggestion I got from this forum is to use a razor or utility knife to precut the face ply prior to sawing it, it prevents splintering too.

Re: Fisherman

Posted: Mon Mar 18, 2019 11:09 am
by epiziali
Thanks for feedback on Meranti. I found some Okuame in So. Cal and freight is not too bad. I am going to go with it. Let you know how it works out for me.

Re: Fisherman

Posted: Mon Mar 18, 2019 12:02 pm
by epiziali
I am down to fine tuning on fairing. Feels good to get through this part. I am going to write down my notes and lessons learned. Maybe someone will come along and benefit from these. If I am off based on your experience, feel free to chime in and provide better guidance as I am no expert after fairing a single boat.

1. When you get really stuck, ask the forum!
2. Before you start taking off material, make a plan for where you are trying to go. Use straight edge or scrap material to help guide you. I found shading in areas to be removed with pencil very useful.
3. Its a slow process. Don't try to go fast. I learned to to take 4-6 passes, and then check my angle and depth. Work small sections. Depending on section, that might only be 8"-12" at a time. I think this helped prevent mistakes (I still made mistakes, but you can recover by adding or subtracting material).
4. If you cannot tell how much material is coming off or if you are at the right angle. Stop. Use your straight edge or scraps to help you figure it out.
5. Small scraps are helpful; I also bought full sheets of cheep underlayment that I found super helpful. Particularly when you get past last frame and work toward the stem.
6. I used 5 tools for fairing. I think each works better/best on different parts of the boat.
Rasp: getting started in certain areas like frames to chine line; stem to chine.
Hand Planer: Chines, this was most fun part for me! Battens.
Power planer: Keel, Sheer clamp, and battens
Belt sander: Keel, stem.
Block planer; here and there. Not much.

And you can never have too many clamps!

Re: Fisherman

Posted: Mon Mar 18, 2019 12:02 pm
by epiziali
tools

Re: Fisherman

Posted: Mon Mar 18, 2019 12:12 pm
by Bill Edmundson
Go to the box store and buy a long, thin piece of molding, as long as you can get home. it will give you a good line across many frames.

epiziali Good list.

Bill