Minnesota Squirt Build

Outboard designs up to 14'

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brockj
Posts: 25
Joined: Fri Sep 13, 2019 8:24 am
Location: Twin Cities, MN

Minnesota Squirt Build

Post by brockj » Mon Nov 04, 2019 8:25 am

I finally decided to to start a topic to track my build. I wanted to start a post as I found other posts tracking a build to be very helpful and influential in my decision to take on this project. Technically the project started about a month ago, but much of the last month has been spent preparing my very small space for the build. In fact, my space is so small, I am not sure I could build anything larger than a squirt.

In preparation I asked questions and did A LOT of research. I started a couple topics here focusing on epoxy viewtopic.php?f=5&p=213038#p213038 and plywood viewtopic.php?t=35297. I also scoured the forum for any tips or information I could find. I ordered the plans and fastener kit from Glen L, and got most of my epoxy supplies locally. I also picked up a copy of Boatbuilding with Plywood.

As for lumber, I decided to go with African Mahogany, available locally for $6.70/bf and scored a heck of deal on some 2 inch "spindles" to be used for the sheers and chines:
IMG_6371.JPG


You may also notice a MASSIVE 21" board that will supply most of the lumber:
IMG_6372.JPG
For the plywood framing I went with Douglas Fir as it was available right away:
IMG_6387.JPG

brockj
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Joined: Fri Sep 13, 2019 8:24 am
Location: Twin Cities, MN

Re: Minnesota Squirt Build

Post by brockj » Mon Nov 04, 2019 8:31 am

As a follow up to previous post, I made a lot of progress this previous weekend now that my VERY small space is mostly ready to go:
59389801637__F4EE3E89-0453-4CBC-A62D-5DD9FBCECF91.JPG
I was able to assemble the frames (the transom had already been assembled), cut the 12* angle on the transom, and rip up all of the lumber for the sheers and chines. I have to say, that made A TON of dust!
IMG_6428.JPG
Being that I am going to stretch the Squirt to 11' I needed to join multiple pieces for each lamination. I followed the advice of 1/12 for the scarf joints and made up a simple jig to use to rip the scarf on my table saw:
IMG_6427.JPG
Worked out very well. I have the sheers gluing up now, but the temps are quite cold right now so it will probably be a week before I can move on to the chines. In the meantime, I might move my frames inside for encapsulation this week.

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vupilot
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Re: Minnesota Squirt Build

Post by vupilot » Mon Nov 04, 2019 2:21 pm

Thanks for posting, look forward to watching your progress.

Hercdrvr
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Re: Minnesota Squirt Build

Post by Hercdrvr » Mon Nov 04, 2019 3:17 pm

Looks like a good start.
Matt B

JimmY
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Location: Brighton, MI

Re: Minnesota Squirt Build

Post by JimmY » Tue Nov 05, 2019 10:29 am

Looking good.

I know you are using solid chines and sheers, but if they are over sized enough, consider ripping them down and laminating them when you install them. It will be a lot easier to bend them into place. Otherwise, look at how others have steam bent their chines.
-Jim
Nothing says poor craftsmanship like wrinkles in your duct tape!

brockj
Posts: 25
Joined: Fri Sep 13, 2019 8:24 am
Location: Twin Cities, MN

Re: Minnesota Squirt Build

Post by brockj » Wed Nov 06, 2019 7:03 am

Thank you all for the support! I decided to move the chines and sheers inside the basement to help them cure a little faster, high temps are right around freezing.
JimmY wrote:
Tue Nov 05, 2019 10:29 am
I know you are using solid chines and sheers, but if they are over sized enough, consider ripping them down and laminating them when you install them. It will be a lot easier to bend them into place. Otherwise, look at how others have steam bent their chines.
Jimmy, actually I am doing lamination's for both the chines and sheers, I was able to pick up the 2"x2" spindles so cheap I figured it was good stock to cut the lamination's from. I went with 5/8"x1 1/4" and 3/8"x 1 3/4" for each lamination and ran them about 13.5' long which I figure should be long enough when stretching the Squirt to 11'.

I figure it is never to early to pickup some parts for down the road, a local store is closing and had MAS fiberglass at a steal of a price. Looking at the kit for the Squirt they showed 4 1/3 yards of 50" and 4 1/3 yards of 38".
IMG_6431.jpg
I picked up 3 (10.8 yards) of the 44' and 1 (3.1 yards) of the 38". I also picked up an additional gallon of the low viscosity resin. The price was so low I am embarrassed to share what I paid :shock:

Anyway, that is my progress so far this week. If I can get out of my meeting tonight I am hoping to glue up the floor timber and deck beam for frame 2 and start encapsulating frame 1.

brockj
Posts: 25
Joined: Fri Sep 13, 2019 8:24 am
Location: Twin Cities, MN

Re: Minnesota Squirt Build

Post by brockj » Mon Nov 11, 2019 8:24 am

Was able to make a bit of progress over the past week (most of it on Sunday). Glued up the chines on Wednesday of last week, then Sunday I started encapsulating the frames, wasn't sure how this would go, but worked out pretty well.

The sheers turned out pretty good:
IMG_6435.jpg
The encapsulation was a time consuming process. Picked up some screen printing squeegee to spread out the epoxy then tipped it off with a foam brush. I tried to get two coats on the transom, the transom knee, the breasthook and one side of frame 1. Turned out pretty well, though it seems frame 1 soaked up quite a bit. Was very pleased with how the transom turned out.
IMG_6436.jpg
Will try to get to frame 2 and the other half of frame 1 during the week, then try to a light sand and final coat of everything with hopes of mounting the framing to building frame next weekend.

JimmY
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Location: Brighton, MI

Re: Minnesota Squirt Build

Post by JimmY » Mon Nov 11, 2019 10:25 am

Lookin good. Your scarf joints turned out nice.
-Jim
Nothing says poor craftsmanship like wrinkles in your duct tape!

brockj
Posts: 25
Joined: Fri Sep 13, 2019 8:24 am
Location: Twin Cities, MN

Re: Minnesota Squirt Build

Post by brockj » Mon Nov 18, 2019 9:05 am

Made some good progress throughout the last week. I got a couple coats of epoxy on the frames for encapsulation, but kept running into issues with drips on the undersides. I thought I was doing an OK job tipping it off with the brush, but must have still been going on too thick. Does rolling help with this? I ended up sanding down all of the frames and figure I will put a final coat once I flip it.

I began mounting the frame members to the building form. Any suggestions on make sure everything is "level in all directions"? I started at the transom, but you can't really "level" it, so I did my best to ensure it was square to the building form. From there I moved on to Frame 1, again ensuring it was square to the transom. I then attempted to level that and realized I have a slight bend in one of the side members, not a lot and my plan is to square that as I mount the sheer as I can easily pull that back into alignment. Or, is there a better way to ensure Frame 1 is level in all directions? I then moved on to Frame 2 ensuring along the chines everything is square. I then started aligning the stem but was running low on time, so it is currently just in place with a single screw to keep it together.

To prepare for the coming week I ripped the keel and two of the battens as I hope to get to the keel this week. And just for fun I clamped the sheer and chines to get a look at the lines. So exciting to see it take shape (and make room to move around the building form for the rest of the winter!)
IMG_6443.jpg

JimmY
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Location: Brighton, MI

Re: Minnesota Squirt Build

Post by JimmY » Tue Nov 19, 2019 6:38 am

Hi Brock,

The tops of the floor members on the transom and Frames should rest on the form to square them up. Any twist in a frame can be easily taken out when you add the sheers and chines like you wrote. Measure from every possible reference point to check your setup.

Some comments and suggestions...

1.) Mount the transom knee to the transom before mounting it to the form. Just easier to align and ensure a good bond.
2.) The keel and battens are dead flat from the transom to frame 1. Use the keel clamped to the transom knee to help set the angle on the transom and adjust it to get the keel flat.
3.) The keel will slope up toward the bow, and will have to be bent down to meet the stem. This will produce an arch in the keel between frame 1 and frame 2. Once you do this, it will probably mess up the keel between the transom and frame 1. So it is a bit of an iterative process. All you have should have to do is adjust the angle on the transom to flatten out the keel again.
4.) I recommend installing the sheers first (book calls for chines first). One they easier to install than the chines, and two they give you a place to brace against to help twist the chines into place. If you don't twist the chines at the bow, you will probably end up having to glue on some extra wood so you have enough meat to fair this area.
5.) Consider making a "chine hook" similar to the breast hook at the top of the stem. It will give you a larger gluing/fastening surface for attaching the chines. I'm sure the joint is fine as designed, but twisting the chines takes a lot of force and it couldn't hurt. I just used 2 layers of 3/4" plywood and cut and shaped it to fit lower on the stem.
6.) When installing the sheers and chines, measure from the center line to each side at a few locations to make sure you have the same bend. You can push and pull along the length of the sheer/chine to increase and decrease the bend. This will be important especially for the sheers since it will determine how symmetrical your deck is.

It's fun to see your work take shape! Keep it up.
-Jim
Nothing says poor craftsmanship like wrinkles in your duct tape!

brockj
Posts: 25
Joined: Fri Sep 13, 2019 8:24 am
Location: Twin Cities, MN

Re: Minnesota Squirt Build

Post by brockj » Tue Nov 19, 2019 8:40 am

Thanks JimmY!

You cannot see it in the picture, but I did mount the transom knee first. I had cut the building form at a 12* angle and when I set the transom onto the form the transom knee was set level, so I think I should be good for the angle on the transom.

For #3, that is one I have been looking at and reading up on as I am aware of the issues Squirt builders have with this. From the Boatbuilding with Plywood book, it does say to achieve the curvature at the stem the keel should be faired to match the curvature of the stem. But I see what you are saying as the cutout for the keel on the stem does angle down (not really accounted for in the book). I have seen that others have bent the keel slightly and added/faired as necessary to keep the keel flat.

One question I do have is regarding the alignment of the stem. From the little booklet included they show using the straight-edge of a board (usually the keel) extending out along the center of the boat and dropping a plumb-bob to center the stem upon. The problem with the squirt is the the cutouts for the keel are not wide enough to allow the keel to sit straight for the plumb bob to drop dead center on the boat. As I am thinking about this, I can attempt to use the keel on edge and drop it. But I am wondering what methods others have used that I might not be thinking of. Once I have that set I can set the keel and move on to the sheer/chines.

BillW
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Location: Seattle, WA

Re: Minnesota Squirt Build

Post by BillW » Tue Nov 19, 2019 5:55 pm

Regarding use of a chine block, or "chine hook" (like the breast hook):

If it is made and installed to the stem correctly, then it will determine the curvature of the foreword ends of the chines,
just as the breast hook does for the sheers. Imagine bending the sheers into place without the breast hook installed: the sheers
would not flare out, at the front, as they should.

If the chines don't flare out enough, at the front, then you will have to glue on shims and re-fair. So, the chine block will prevent
that situation. When making it, I found photo's on the Glen-L site, of other boats that use a chine block. Then I made a mock-up with
thin sticks to simulate the chines, and made a drawing from that.

About cutting it out: I made it a bit large (in the fore and aft dimension) so I could recover from cutting mistakes, and end up
with about the size intended in the first place. It took me a couple of tries.

JimmY
Posts: 922
Joined: Sat Jul 30, 2016 11:08 am
Location: Brighton, MI

Re: Minnesota Squirt Build

Post by JimmY » Thu Nov 21, 2019 10:43 am

Hi Brock,

Regarding the stem, if the keel notch is cut per the plans and the stem is aligned properly then you should not need to shim the keel when bolting/epoxying it in place. The keel will arch between frame #1 and #2, and this is fine. The keel only needs to be flat from frame #1 to the transom. For me, the easiest way to get the keel flat was to adjust the angle on the transom slightly.

During my build, I ran a string from the center of the breast hook to top/center of the transom. I used a level from the stem or keel down and measured to this line (repeat on the other side of the stem/keel to make sure).

P.S. Use packing tape or similar where the frames contact the building form. You will thank yourself when you crawl under there to unmount it for flipping. :shock:
-Jim
Nothing says poor craftsmanship like wrinkles in your duct tape!

brockj
Posts: 25
Joined: Fri Sep 13, 2019 8:24 am
Location: Twin Cities, MN

Re: Minnesota Squirt Build

Post by brockj » Sun Nov 24, 2019 6:49 am

Thanks for the feedback, I did get the keel attached yesterday (will try to get some pics up in a little bit), but I definitely got the hump between Frame 1 and Frame 2, I think it still looks pretty good between the transom and frame 1. So is the general consensus to leave the hump between Frame 1 and Frame 2 alone? Should that get faired down? I have been reading on this and seems to be lots of opinions.

JimmY
Posts: 922
Joined: Sat Jul 30, 2016 11:08 am
Location: Brighton, MI

Re: Minnesota Squirt Build

Post by JimmY » Mon Nov 25, 2019 6:25 am

Hi Brock,

As long as your keel is straight/flat from the transom to frame #1 and there is a smooth, convex curve frame #1 to the stem, you will be al right. You just don't the keel to have any concave areas.

My $0.02
-Jim
Nothing says poor craftsmanship like wrinkles in your duct tape!

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