Building The Vera Cruise

Designs for inboard or outboard power

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mrintense
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Re: Building The Vera Cruise

Post by mrintense »

Thanks for taking the time to respond Tim, Mike, Bryan Jimmy, and Jim. I thought about this quite a bit today . I must have flipped back and forth between the pictures two dozen times during the course of the day. I went out and looked at the two templates, and finally decided that I am going to stay with the original window cutouts.

I think the engineering questions about the sliding front windows are valid and after looking over the windows in this area, I think I am okay with leaving them the way they are. The aft window, really came down to aesthetics, I somewhat likes the sharper curve of the modified design, but ultimately felt that it did not look as good as the original. Perhaps a different shape might work, but I am going to move on and try and get these finished.

Thanks again for the input, it is much appreciated.

In other news, I got the curve of the roof line drawn using a batten and a lot of clamps. It took quite a while to get it where it looked right, but eventually I did. Afterwards I rough cut the excess wood off and then planed down to the drawn lines. The windows will be next. Here it is so far.

The windows have not been cut out so the verticals are still much wider than they will ultimately be.
The windows have not been cut out so the verticals are still much wider than they will ultimately be.
Carl

Crafting a classically styled Vera Cruise

Clipper Boating

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chugalug
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Re: Building The Vera Cruise

Post by chugalug »

:D Just a note- on the old Chris-craft,there is a chrome engine air scoop,aft of last side window(course you won't need that with outboard) :D
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hoodman
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Re: Building The Vera Cruise

Post by hoodman »

I think the windows as designed look really great. That being said, I couldn't tell a whole lot of difference between that and your modified design. I don't think you'll regret going with Glen's original lines. He's usually right on where it's important. Although, there is a funny thing about the Geronimo. If I had made the front bench seat as designed, I probably would be about chin level with the top of the dash. It works great as a back seat though!

The cabin is going to be a real showstopper Carl!
Matt

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mrintense
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Re: Building The Vera Cruise

Post by mrintense »

I had to wait several days while I completed the shaping of the port side cabin. At this point it's done except for sanding the surfaces. I had to buy a hand held oscillating sander to do the interior edges of the window cutouts. I can't get over how dense this wood is. Bring the sander to the edge and watch the paper wear out and only slow progress on removing the wood!! But the first one is done now. It's going to be a few more days before I can finish the second one as there are household chores waiting (Again!!)


IMG_20190606_174704.jpg
IMG_20190606_174722.jpg
Carl

Crafting a classically styled Vera Cruise

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Jimbob
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Re: Building The Vera Cruise

Post by Jimbob »

Try a router with a 1/8" rounder bit with a bearing. Easier than sanding.
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Re: Building The Vera Cruise

Post by footer »

I see two options;
Like Jim said, use a rounded bit with a bearing. If it's too much round for your taste, raise it up a hair in your router.
The other option is to use a tougher sandpaper, like an emery cloth. Then finish with a finer grit. I like to use those foam sanding blocks. They contour to the edges well.
I feel ya on the chores.

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Re: Building The Vera Cruise

Post by mrintense »

Thanks Jim and Footer. I need to clarify things a bit. What I was talking about was taking the rough cuts down to the drawn lines for the cutouts. I used a planer to get close (where I could) and finished with the sanders. As for the edges I think you both meant, I will be using a round over bit in my router (probably). I am still working out the details on how the windows will eventually be installed.
Carl

Crafting a classically styled Vera Cruise

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billy c
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Re: Building The Vera Cruise

Post by billy c »

the sanding drums that you can chuck into a drill can get you there either in a drill press or hand held
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mrintense
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Re: Building The Vera Cruise

Post by mrintense »

I have drums similar to these Billy.


In other news, I am experimenting with ways to have the forward cabin window open. After looking at it for quite awhile, I am pretty sure that having the window as sliding is not going to work out to my satisfaction. There are several reasons for this, some to do with the aesthetics of the sliding rails and some with the geometry of the windows. The original design has the windows fixed so the shapes are not an issue.

I considered various ways of hinging the windows and even considered removable windows. So far the idea I like best is illustrated in the drawing included with this posting.

The basic idea is that the window is inset into the cabin sides on the exterior with appropriate seals under the window edges to keep water out. A window surround made from wood covers the edges of the window. This surround would be the same shape as the window, but with overlaps that would overlap over the edges of the cabin side window openings.

Two inset euro style hinges would be mounted to the inside of the cabin sides on the top edge of the window cutout and would attach to the window surround (and through the window itself). Wooden bungs would cover the fasteners on the exterior of the surround.

The window would hinge upward and outward, possibly needed some form of support, but not sure on that yet. I've decided to go with polycarbonate windows rather than glass, mainly to save on weight and expense, but also because it will be easier to work with.

Hopefully the drawing will illustrate what I am thinking. The hinges on the open and closed views are not too scale, they are just there to illustrate the general idea.

I am open to opinions , thoughts, etc.

Update : (Added for clarity) This drawing is looking forward . The windows swing upwards.

Cabin Side Window Hinge Idea.png
Last edited by mrintense on Sat Jun 08, 2019 3:55 am, edited 1 time in total.
Carl

Crafting a classically styled Vera Cruise

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BarnacleMike
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Re: Building The Vera Cruise

Post by BarnacleMike »

If they swing open to the forward, then you might have an issue with them catching wind with the forward motion of the boat.
"How long does it take to build a boat? Until it's finished" — yours truly
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mrintense
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Re: Building The Vera Cruise

Post by mrintense »

Sorry Mike, I should have made this more clear.This is a view looking forward. The widows would swing upwards.
Carl

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gdcarpenter
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Re: Building The Vera Cruise

Post by gdcarpenter »

Don't know the actual dimensions of the windows in question, but would 2 hinges be strong enough?

Also wondering if you might run into nterference with the exterior trim at the top of the window possibly hitting the wall unless the hinges 'pop' the window out before tilting, and there is nothing to keep water from dripping down behind the top trim.

Blum Hines are 35 my diameter I believe and about 1/3" deep, don't know if this might weaken the wall.

How about something like an awning mechanism something like this:

https://www.reflectwindow.com/Truth-Har ... 20d751fc0e

Seems that you would need a continuous frame built around the window, inset within the wall, and if it's a fairly large window the framing would add stability.
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mrintense
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Re: Building The Vera Cruise

Post by mrintense »

Thanks for the thoughtful answer GD. This is why I put these types of questions to the forum. Like you and others, I have these same thoughts and I am still considering this and other options (including just fixing the windows in place).

And to answer your technical questions, two hinges may be enough, I don't know and would have to experiment. Clearance of the top edge could be a problem and it looks like it in the drawings, but again, this would be better determined through experimentation. One thing I realized last night is that the drawing is essentially similar to inset cabinet doors with the hinge hidden on the inside of the cabinet. So I am going to look into this further.

My preference would be to have some way to reach the outside of the cabin without having to climb onto the side decking, in order to do rope and fender placement. But the geometry of the windows and the cabin sides makes this a difficult proposition. This is especially true when one also desires to take aesthetics into consideration.

The drawing I posted is the result of me and a friend spending about 45 minutes brainstorming ideas while looking at the picture I recently posted of the cabin side assembly. We tried to consider clearances, aesthetics, intrusion into interior space, engineering the hinges, and so forth. He had a few ideas for making the windows slide which I am going to explore some more. Sliding windows would be the easiest to engineer, but present problems with supporting the window when slid aft. The challenge here is that the upper slide rail would be at an angle to the aft window and not look that great.

And believe it or not, we even briefly considered car-like windows that slid down into the hull, but quickly ruled that out.

Anyway, I appreciate any thoughts , concerns, ideas, etc that people can post here while I consider all options. Thanks in advance.
Carl

Crafting a classically styled Vera Cruise

Clipper Boating

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Jimbob
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Re: Building The Vera Cruise

Post by Jimbob »

Hi Carl,
Here are my thoughts on what do on the window situation.
Why not have it so both front and back window could slide? With the tracks shown below, you could do that, or put a stop so the back window couldn't slide if that is what you want. Using the slides, I would keep the top and bottom pieces of the glass straight and parallel to each other so they would not bind when moved. I would cut the front and rear pieces of the glass to follow the curve on your opening. The forward piece of glass should overlap the rear glass, so when the boat is going forward, water doesn't get in. You could drill holes in the tracks and the glass with a pin (wooden of course) so that you could keep the glass from moving or open at preset positions. You could also probably just use felt. All of this assumes that the tracks are mounted on the inside of the boat.
Looks like the pics below might incorporate rollers. You could probably also find just some aluminum tracks for the glass to slide in.
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Jim
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BarnacleMike
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Re: Building The Vera Cruise

Post by BarnacleMike »

Carl,

Just a thought, but what about hinging the widows to the inside rather than outward? If there are obstructions preventing the windows from resting against the interior cabin walls, then perhaps upward and somehow secured to the ceiling?
"How long does it take to build a boat? Until it's finished" — yours truly
Why did the boatbuilder get a divorce? Because he didn't have enough clamps to hold his marriage together!

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