Building The Vera Cruise

Designs for inboard or outboard power

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mrintense
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Re: Building The Vera Cruise

Post by mrintense »

Honestly, I went back and forth about the idea of flotation foam. According to some reference material I read somewhere, boats 21 foot and above are not required to have the foam. I am not sure if that is true or not. My boat is at 21 feet in length. Adding foam is going to take quite a bit of extra effort mainly because I do not want to just pour it in places, but rather have it removable when possible or at the very least molded to fit in a compartment before installation. Trying to pour it into compartments seems too haphazard and uncontrollable given the nature of my boats internal structure.

I will be using block foam in some places to save the time of building molds.

At any rate, I decided to go ahead with it, mostly for the insulation factor, but I will also make sure there is sufficient foam to keep the boat afloat. It does delay the launch at least for some of it because of its location under the floor boards. I'll also be placing foam in the side compartments but this can come a bit later since the interior side paneling will not be installed before the launch. I also want to to see how the wiring, fuel lines, cabling, etc fills out the side compartments.
Carl

Crafting a classically styled Vera Cruise

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mrintense
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Re: Building The Vera Cruise

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Started the experiment with making a flotation foam tray. We'll see how well this approach works. Since it's going under the floorboards, it doesn't have to be perfect, just functional.

Basically I screwed to boards together to get the right width and another board underneath to get the right height. Edges were rounded. Everything was covered with plastic sheet and then the glass laid over the top, down the sides and then out a bit (for the flange). Epoxy was applied to everything and now we wait for it to set up.

It should be a hat section when finished ( a "U" with flanges on the upper ends going out). If it still fits and works out, then I will cut sections to length and fiberglass the ends closed. Then fill with flotation foam. I may also reinforce the flanges with an extra piece of cloth since thats were the most stress will be.

I have to make approximately 5 more of these of slightly less width and various heights and I think the next go around, I will pace boards on the table then cover them with the plastic. The table sags a bit in the middle so I had to prop it up to try and keep things relatively flat.

PXL_20210320_185214947.jpg
Carl

Crafting a classically styled Vera Cruise

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mrintense
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Re: Building The Vera Cruise

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Okay, so the experiment to make the flotation tray worked out okay after I added a second layer of glass cloth. One layer of cloth is too flimsy. This one is so so as far as construction, but it will be functional. I learned from making this one what I need to do for the remainders and they should come out better. One thing though. There are going to be a few dead bugs permanently part of this boat! :D :D

This will be cleaned up, trimmed to the correct length and filled with flotation foam. It should fit between the floor supports.
This will be cleaned up, trimmed to the correct length and filled with flotation foam. It should fit between the floor supports.

I am also working on the hatch covers for the motorwell side compartments. I am going back and forth on whether to make them flush or sit on the surface. Flush mount might look better but presents leakage problems which would be difficult to correct. I would also have to build in landings and getting the gaps just right would be a PITA.

Surface mount is easier, can be sealed for water intrusion, will still probably look fine. But hinging them will require an addition piece on the surface top given the hinges I am planning on using. This last part could be mitigated by using offset hinges rather than flat (which is what I originally purchased a while back). We'll see. But I think I probably will go with surface mount. I can always convert it to flush later if I want.

I have not trimmed the size of the cover yet, only glued in the inner structure. I will also be edging the cover with hardwood and the entire thing will be covered in fiberglass cloth.
I have not trimmed the size of the cover yet, only glued in the inner structure. I will also be edging the cover with hardwood and the entire thing will be covered in fiberglass cloth.
Carl

Crafting a classically styled Vera Cruise

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sshamilt@gmail.com
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Re: Building The Vera Cruise

Post by sshamilt@gmail.com »

I wish I had your attention to details. I really need to make an ordered list and stick with it
Steve

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Re: Building The Vera Cruise

Post by steveh41 »

Carl, looks like a good call on surface mount hatch covers. Everything is looking very sharp!


Steve
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mrintense
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Re: Building The Vera Cruise

Post by mrintense »

Thanks Steve and Steve,

The task list for me is a must. I could have never gotten this far without it. Having it on the computer makes it easier to keep up to date . I can re-arrange items, add items, and remove items quite easily. Being able to re-arrange makes it great because I am always thinking of new things I have to deal with, so I just add them to the list and periodically reorder the list as needed. What I actually do is keep separate lists for different areas of the boat because I have typically worked on one area, then moved to another and had tasks remaining to do in the first. This helps when I eventually return to that area of the boat.
Carl

Crafting a classically styled Vera Cruise

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mrintense
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Re: Building The Vera Cruise

Post by mrintense »

Okay, the fiberglass flotation tray experiment didn't work out. For a few reasons. The main one is that they are a bit too big to fit between the floor structure. I thought I allowed for that but I guess not. The second reason is that they look like crap and I just can't bring myself to use them even if I make them fit. They were an attempt to avoid spending a lot of effort making something that was going to be hidden, but making just this one example took three days so that isn't too great either.

So I am going to come up with a different approach. I'm not sure yet what that will be. But I need to get an answer to one question which is: just how sticky is the pourable expandable foam. If I mold it in something, will it come out with a release agent or do I need something I can peel away (or flex away - like a rubber bin). I expect I will have to trim them to size regardless but I have 4 gallons of the foam and I need to find a way to make it work.

One thing I do not want to do is glue the foam to the lids and try to fit it between the floor structure. I would prefer that it was already there when the floorboards are installed. That means that I need some sort of support for the foam to hold it in place. I don't want it settling into the bilge area. In retrospect, I should have bought sheet foam, but it is what it is.
Carl

Crafting a classically styled Vera Cruise

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sshamilt@gmail.com
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Re: Building The Vera Cruise

Post by sshamilt@gmail.com »

Hey Carl
I have a couple of ideas.

I am pretty sure you can use wax paper or parchment paper laid into the cavities with a sheet of ply under it to simulate the gap underneath, pour the foam in place letting it foam up past the top of the frames. Then using a saw, cut it flush to the frame tops. Once cut, peal off the plastic. Flip it over, drill a 1 inch hole in each corner and insert a 1 inch dowel of the appropriate length. Just make sure all the seams in the paper are taped. The foam will find any gaps and stick the underlying material

Second option if you don't want to pour in place is to make open top boxes. You would not need one for every cavity but a set of 3-4 would give you the blocks that you can then cut to fit. Pour and let it cure, then unscrew the box and knock the parts off of the foam. It should cut well on a band saw or with a pull saw to custom fit to the cavities. If the boards don't knock off you can always cut them way with a pull saw.
Steve

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Re: Building The Vera Cruise

Post by hoodman »

Carl, I think others have poured into shallow Rubbermaid bins and then cut to fit as needed. I would not think the foam would stick to the bins but I don't know how easy the blocks would be to get out. You could always line the bins with plastic wrap if necessary. I have also seen more than one person encapsulate and fiberglass the foam, which sounds quite tedious. I have a two-gallon kit that I have yet to do anything with so I don't have any practical experience to share.
Matt

Building a Geronimo......!
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Re: Building The Vera Cruise

Post by mrintense »

Thanks for the replies Steve and Matt. I like the idea of using small standoffs to support the bottom. That's a better idea than having to drape something over the floor structures between cavities. I am considering using doors kin rather than plywood and leaving it in place. This gives the standoffs something more firm to push against. I'm going to think on it some more before making a decision. There's 24 cavities just in the aft cabin alone and a similar number in the main cabin, so it needs to be something that doesn't take me half the year to finish (especially given my slow pace of building!!) :lol: :lol:

IN the meantime, I am working on the motorwell side compartment top hatch covers which are about 60% completed and I've added rubber sound isolation strips to the floor structure under the port and starboard sides. I'll do the center section once I get a few other tasks completed. The rubber is mainly to try to avoid squeaking from the floorboards but they will also provide some protection between the floorboards and the structure.

PXL_20210324_214246895.MP.jpg
Carl

Crafting a classically styled Vera Cruise

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chugalug
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Re: Building The Vera Cruise

Post by chugalug »

It's nice that I'm not the only one with dead bugs.When I was varnishing my cabin ceiling,The spiders all hatched the night before.Poor little buggers are part of the ceiling now.
Working on regular-sized Bo-Jest


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Re: Building The Vera Cruise

Post by psychobilly »

chugalug wrote:
Sat Mar 27, 2021 7:47 pm
Poor little buggers are part of the ceiling now.
Good place for them. :wink:

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Re: Building The Vera Cruise

Post by chugalug »

The big dock spiders wouldn't come out either-foam in a can works. :D
Working on regular-sized Bo-Jest


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Re: Building The Vera Cruise

Post by mrintense »

Most of the bugs in my boat are mere carcasses as I usually try to scrape them off. Really, there isn't too many, but its a constant battle.


Well vacation time from work is nearly over, back to the grind tomorrow. I made pretty fair progress. There always seems to be a million things to do and I just keep plugging through them. Worse thing is waiting on paint or epoxy to cure. especially if it inhibits sanding in the area. Ans we all know how much sanding we have to do. Not a day goes by without..........................


The last thing I got done this evening was fiberglassing and epoxying the top side of the motorwell hatch covers. Still have to do the inner surfaces with epoxy only. I decided to buy offset hinges which should be here in a day or two, although they won't get installed for quite some time. The entire motorwell area is going to be painted eventually, I may see if I can come up with some way to dress up the hatch covers, but for now they will remain flat and plain.
PXL_20210329_001948319.jpg

Version 2 of the flotation foam trays is in work. Here is one of the smaller ones under assembly. The idea is to support them on dowel rods resting on the bilge surface. They will be trapped by the floor structure and the floor boards so they won't move around. I am going to fill them with expandable foam and trim flush.

PXL_20210329_002257370.jpg
Carl

Crafting a classically styled Vera Cruise

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chugalug
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Re: Building The Vera Cruise

Post by chugalug »

At least you're getting something done. not stuck in hospital for 5 days,stuck in covid house for another 5 days then stay at riverside resort for another 4 days as Canada requires a minimum of 14 days quarantine to go through to get home(I have to drive a 40 mile stretch of Canada to get home to Angle.) :evil:
Working on regular-sized Bo-Jest


"If it's not crooked,It's not mine

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