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Re: Building The Vera Cruise

Posted: Fri Jul 31, 2020 7:38 pm
by hoodman
All I have are tach, fuel, trim. Everything else is on dummy lights. I get the idea of the look of all the gauges but they are really superfluous on a modern engine. It will either run at reduced power or shut itself completely off if somethings wrong. Engine hours can be read by the dealer off the diagnostic port.

And you should see the REDICULOUS amounts of wires I have for three gauges.

Also, don't forget to put in a cupholder for yourself. Many times you'll need a hand on the throttle and steering.

Re: Building The Vera Cruise

Posted: Fri Jul 31, 2020 7:56 pm
by denbrlr
Carl,

I like options 1 or 2 but I might change the locations of one or two of the small gauges. I do like oil pressure at the top. I suggest on the right, put fuel at the top, then volts, then water temp. On the right, I suggest swapping hours and trim.

Lee

Re: Building The Vera Cruise

Posted: Sat Aug 01, 2020 4:52 am
by TomB
Carl,

Have you selected a steering wheel? From the helm seat, I like the layout that gives best gauge visibility.

I like options 1 & 2 and maybe 1a. 1a moves the trim and volts discs in option 1 to the upper corners, so a cluster of three in each corner with the tach low center. (1a is probably one of options 3 through 7 :D )

Tom

Re: Building The Vera Cruise

Posted: Sat Aug 01, 2020 5:26 am
by mrintense
Thanks for the feedback on positioning Lee and Tom. This is what I was hoping for. Tom, Your idea was missed by me so I've added it to the options. It's option 10 ! :D :D I do already have a steering wheel, its a destroyer style steel wheel. Regardless of where I place the gauges, some of them are going to b partially obscured. However nothing that can't be lived with.

Lee, the previous photos had not given any thought to which gauges went where, only the placement of small versus large. However I do agree that the engine monitoring gauges should be near each other.

Matt, thanks for the feedback. I have already purchased all the gauges so leaving some off would not be an option for me. Besides, its as much about the look as the functionality when it comes to the dash. Wiring will increase, but the dash panel is going to be hinged for easy access and I am designing the helm cabinet with large access openings as well.

Here is option 10 based upon Tom's suggestion. I did place the small gauges where I think they would be best in this shot.

BTW, not shown in any of my pictures so far, my trim switch is steering wheel mounted, like a turn signal stalk, but not as long. I assumed it would be on the left side of the wheel since the right hand will be controlling the throttle. So I wanted trim where I can see it.

IMG_20200801_070842.jpg

Re: Building The Vera Cruise

Posted: Sat Aug 01, 2020 5:59 am
by JimmY
hoodman wrote:
Fri Jul 31, 2020 7:38 pm
Also, don't forget to put in a cupholder for yourself. Many times you'll need a hand on the throttle and steering.
+1 on the cup holder! :lol:

Re: Building The Vera Cruise

Posted: Sat Aug 01, 2020 7:39 am
by kens
on guage layouts, you generally put the highest priority at the top, the easiest to quick scan the priority from top to bottom.
My own priority would be oil, temp, and amps on top row.
trim is low priority ( it has seat of the pants backup) and you can always get home without it
fuel is not high priority because it goes down slowly

I like your option 10 except swap water temp & trim
you could easily scan top row and that is all the major items, and see my top 3 items thru the spokes of steering wheel,
bottom row is minor items

Re: Building The Vera Cruise

Posted: Sat Aug 01, 2020 9:03 am
by mrintense
kens wrote:
Sat Aug 01, 2020 7:39 am
on guage layouts, you generally put the highest priority at the top, the easiest to quick scan the priority from top to bottom.
My own priority would be oil, temp, and amps on top row.
trim is low priority ( it has seat of the pants backup) and you can always get home without it
fuel is not high priority because it goes down slowly

I like your option 10 except swap water temp & trim
you could easily scan top row and that is all the major items, and see my top 3 items thru the spokes of steering wheel,
bottom row is minor items
I agree. I think I like option 10 the best as well. And placing the higher priority gauges higher is a good point. I think I will place water temp and oil pressure on the left top, volts and fuel on the right top, hours on lower row to right of steering and trim will go on the lower row to the left of the steering wheel. Thanks for the tweak.

Re: Building The Vera Cruise

Posted: Sat Aug 01, 2020 9:22 am
by TomB
+1 on #10. Big question, what's the boss think?

I'd space them a little different too, a little more space between the top four, so the gaps between the tach and four gauges is the same and the gaps within gauges in each pod are the same -- from the photo, oil and volts closer together, hours up and to the right, temp up and to the left...or not.

Tom

Re: Building The Vera Cruise

Posted: Sat Aug 01, 2020 10:59 am
by Tony Hain
Hi Carl,
I go with option 10. It has a nice symmetry but I might be a tad obsessive. Also it leaves room on the bottom left and right where you could put ignition, starter button, push pull switches, etc

Re: Building The Vera Cruise

Posted: Sat Aug 01, 2020 3:28 pm
by kens
where is the ignition key switch?
in a suzuki fwd-n-rev control box?
a standalone switch to fit into same area?

Re: Building The Vera Cruise

Posted: Sun Aug 02, 2020 7:38 pm
by psychobilly
I have a Suzuki 200 and I have no gauges like this. Only one digital gauge and actually everything is displayed on my H-Bird through NEMA.

1EA693DA-FC75-430F-9E38-7B8FB883DF6A.jpeg

Re: Building The Vera Cruise

Posted: Tue Aug 04, 2020 2:54 pm
by mrintense
Thanks for the feedback guys.

Wife likes option 10 as well.

Billy, instruments are what I'll be going with. I like the look.


In other news, had a set back today. Something I've been worrying about and I wish that I had acted on sooner. Today it became all too apparent.

I assembled the seat and post and clamped it to the helm platform. I was actually trying to see if the placement of the steering and throttle control were going to work. Once I had the seat clamped in place I sat down. Seated, everything feels okay, however the seat has to be slid back quite a bit on the sliding base.

But the real problem is standing. There is no getting around it, standing at the helm is not going to work as I am way too close to the helm cabinet and even then rubbing up against the chair.

You can see in the picture that the seat is already mounted at the back of the platform. Arrgghhh!


IMG_20200804_161401.jpg


Okay so I was in denial for a while, telling myself, "You can live with it". But I know better. What's unfortunate is that a better, sturdier mock up than the poster board I used would have positively made this apparent.

I've been thinking it over, weighing my options and they come down to this.

1. Remake the entire thing - Not really liking this too much
2. Live with it - No!!
3. Shorten the depth of the forward side - At best I might gain 3 inches but more importantly, it seriously restricts the space I need for the electrical panel in the lower cabinet. Also it would mean some pretty serious disassembly with high risk of damage.
4. Lengthen the platform aft

This last option seems the best choice.
I can gain whatever distance I need this way. I'm thinking an extra 8 to 12 inches should be sufficient, but I will definitely measure first.
It's relatively easy to make the modifications. There is some work involved, but still safer and easier than total rebuild or partial disassembly in the other options.

There are a few downsides.

The wood veneer on the inboard panel will have a seam at the extension. I could probably cover this with trim.
The floorboard aft of the platform will need to be shortened in length and corresponding structure added underneath to support the lengthened floor board under the helm platform.
I'll have to extend the structure of the platform as well.

The top cover pieces for the platform will need to be remade or extended, however these were going to be glassed anyway so that shouldn't be an issue. Same for the wall paneling on the outboard side.

Anyway, the wind has been blown out of my sails at the moment so I am going to spend some time mulling this over. :(

Re: Building The Vera Cruise

Posted: Tue Aug 04, 2020 4:22 pm
by acflynn
I think you may have mentioned it previously many, many pages ago, but what about one of the hinged captain's chairs? It would allow for standing at the helm, and it could be flipped up with the metal pole support base still residing on the platform (likely towards the edge). You may have dismissed that previously for other technical or space reasons, and I'm unsure of the attachment point on/near your coaming board, but without those constraints it seems like a possible solution. Most of the old Chris-Craft express cruisers had that type of configuration.

- Andrew

Re: Building The Vera Cruise

Posted: Tue Aug 04, 2020 4:27 pm
by TomB
Carl,

How about just adding to the platform under the chair base cylinder, kind of like this _n_

Tom

Re: Building The Vera Cruise

Posted: Tue Aug 04, 2020 5:14 pm
by mrintense
Thanks for the answers Andrew and Tom.

I did consider the side mounted hinged seat at one time, but just never liked the looks of them. It does have the advantage of getting out of the way. I may give this some additional thought.

Tom, What you are suggesting is what I mentioned in the 4th option. I probably was so long winded that it didn't come across very well. I've been out looking at the structure and have a plan for extending the platform if I decide to go that way. I also did some additional moving of the seat around to try and find the best placement fore and aft.

If I add 8 inches to the platform I will be able to mount the seat at 27 inches from the helm cabinet which puts it in about the right spot for standing (as long as the seat is slid back)and still close enough that I can reach the helm (as long as the seat is slid forward). 8 inches would leave about an inch of platform remaining beyond the seat so I would probably extend it a bit more to be safe.

I might revisit the side hinged seat like Andrew mentioned. The structure's there to support it. Of course I would have to get a different seat and sell the seat and post I just bought.

:shock: :shock: :? :?