Building The Vera Cruise

Designs for inboard or outboard power

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nc721
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Re: Building The Vera Cruise

Post by nc721 »

Really looking good. Can’t wait to see it all together.
Nick

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mrintense
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Re: Building The Vera Cruise

Post by mrintense »

I am going to start working on the motorwell / splash well now that most of the helm work is done. Of course there is more to do on the helm, but until I get the hardware, I want to continue with something else. I also need a change of pace. To get the helm out of the way, I hade to move it back into the boat. It was a bit of a challenge doing this, but got it in with no damage. I'll have to shuffle things around later when I work on the floorboards and the bilge, but there's room to move the helm around.

IMG_20200913_184248.jpg
IMG_20200913_184230.jpg
Carl

Crafting a classically styled Vera Cruise

Clipper Boating

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Milhouse
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Re: Building The Vera Cruise

Post by Milhouse »

The helm turned out really well. As my woodworking teacher said "There are no mistakes in woodworking, only design opportunities." The curve on the back to make the platform longer really fits in well.
Jim
16' Ski Boat Restoration
17' Overnighter Sloop

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nc721
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Re: Building The Vera Cruise

Post by nc721 »

Carl
Near the beginning of your build you talked a bit about raising the roof for more headroom. What did your actual headroom end up being?
Nick
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mrintense
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Re: Building The Vera Cruise

Post by mrintense »

nc721 wrote:
Tue Sep 15, 2020 4:04 pm
Carl
Near the beginning of your build you talked a bit about raising the roof for more headroom. What did your actual headroom end up being?
Nick
Nick,

To be honest, way back then I had incorrect ideas about how big the boat was going to be. Furthermore , I was still planning on building the cabin per plans with just a slight rise in height. Later (about three years) I decided to go with a shorter length cabin and a relatively continuous height floor as well as keeping the back of the cabin open.

When it came time to work out the curves for the roof line, I experimented with a taller cabin design, but it didn't look right with the shorter length, so it's pretty much at normal height. And the continuous floor height was an attempt to increase the amount of floor space, so it was higher than the narrow space in the cabin design on the plans.

The end result is that the cabin is only good for sitting or lying down. My intent with the shorter length cabin was to increase the aft cabin area where I felt we would be spending most of our time. There's no height issues back there.

I know of a Vera Cruise built in England where the builder stayed with the original cabin design and added about 2 inches to the cabin height successfully, so if standing in that narrow space in the cabin, I believe he got the headroom to 5' 10". Mine is more like 5" 5".

I suppose it comes down to what you want and how much you want to deviate from the looks of the boat. I accepted the shorter cabin height to get the other design elements I was after.
Carl

Crafting a classically styled Vera Cruise

Clipper Boating

nc721
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Re: Building The Vera Cruise

Post by nc721 »

Thanks Carl. I like the idea of raising the cabin roof a couple of inches but I still have plenty of time to think about it.
Nick

Evan
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Re: Building The Vera Cruise

Post by Evan »

Looking good. I did not see it but have you kept a running cost?

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mrintense
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Re: Building The Vera Cruise

Post by mrintense »

Evan,
I do have a running total of parts and materials, however, I have been excessive in my use of epoxy and it also includes quite a few parts that are not going to work out. However, I would say that a boat this size and style will easily cost 20K, even more if you you go with a brand new engine. Not including the engine, I've spent about 22K so far. I expect to spend about 12K for the motor, and 4K for the trailer (unless I get a good deal on one). I also expect that the remaining electrical components and paint and upholstery will easily be another 2 to 3K.

One thing about my build is that these costs are spread over 8 plus years and I've been saving for the motor and trailer the entire time. I am determined to come out of this with no debt so I've been very careful about not borrowing to purchase materials or equipment.
Carl

Crafting a classically styled Vera Cruise

Clipper Boating

nc721
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Re: Building The Vera Cruise

Post by nc721 »

I have been keeping track of expenses as well. I keep a separate tally for things that are actually going in to the boat and consumables/incidentals. At the rate I am going my cost will be very similar to yours Carl.
Nick

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mrintense
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Re: Building The Vera Cruise

Post by mrintense »

Starting on the motorwell now. Mainly as a change of pace from the helm which still needs some more work.

IMG_20200919_144914.jpg
Carl

Crafting a classically styled Vera Cruise

Clipper Boating

Evan
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Re: Building The Vera Cruise

Post by Evan »

thanks Carl. I want a 18-20 boat for fishing and have been trying to decide to build not or just get an older one that has been re-powered.

I am leaning towards building.

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mrintense
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Re: Building The Vera Cruise

Post by mrintense »

I'm still working on the motorwell. It's more design work than I initially realized. The basic design is simple enough, but trying to keep it strong while incorporating the various compartments and giving access where needed has had me in the thinking chair quite a bit lately. This picture, although unremarkable, actually illustrates some of what I am talking about.

On my boat the batteries will be on the port rear quarter to help offset the weight of me and the helm station. This compartment is part of the strength of the motorwell but needs to have access to the batteries. This access needs to be good enough that checking and filling battery solution won't be a major undertaking. It also needs to accommodate some battery switches.

Then the compartment needs to be accessible from the motorwell bulkhead (because of other things I will mention in a moment). This accessibility needs to be big enough to get the batteries into the compartment (keeping in mind their considerable weight and my aged muscles) and the compartment needs to be big enough to run the necessary battery cabling.

I also desire to have some ventilation for any escaping hydrogen. And here's another complication. The fuel tank is forward of this compartment (about 5 feet forward) and the fuel line from te tank to the outboard is going to have to travel back through this compartment to the motor. Yeah.

So given the necessity of separation of electrical and fuel components (for fumes and leaks), there will need to be a sealed compartment above the battery compartment for the fuel line to go through. This means a second access point on the bulkhead in case access to the fuel line is needed. The top of the compartment is also closed off as part of the outside design of the boat.

All of this means that this compartment needs to be pretty stout.

And finally, if you notice, one of the batteries is going to have to be partially under the carling. The carlings will eventually have paneling going down to the cabin floor (on the other side of the motorwell bulkhead). This means that the access opening for the batteries is going to be partially obscured by the interior paneling. Or in other words, the access panel will be smaller than the compartment, meaning that accessing the outboard battery is going to be problem. I will also need some light in there to see the batteries well enough for servicing.

So the thinking chair has been somewhat busy as of late.

PXL_20200930_220136831.jpg
Carl

Crafting a classically styled Vera Cruise

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hoodman
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Re: Building The Vera Cruise

Post by hoodman »

My fuel line goes right through the battery compartment. I never even gave it a second thought. Nor, apparently, did the gentleman that rigged my outboard.

Why not simplify and put a hatch in the deck above the batteries?
Matt

Building a Geronimo......!
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TomB
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Re: Building The Vera Cruise

Post by TomB »

Hey Carl,

My fishing boat had a starter battery under a hatch adjacent to the splash well. Add a shelf to get the battery to the top of the compartment and store something under? The boat also had a couple of large deep cycle batteries for the trolling motor. Those were in trays with hold down straps. Open the door, pop the strap and strain to raise the battery an inch to slide it onto the deck for service. There was about 2' of slack in the battery cables. Service for me was twice a year so not to bad. Maybe a nugget you can use.

Tom
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mrintense
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Re: Building The Vera Cruise

Post by mrintense »

Thanks for responding Matt and Tom.

hoodman wrote:
Wed Sep 30, 2020 6:53 pm
My fuel line goes right through the battery compartment. I never even gave it a second thought. Nor, apparently, did the gentleman that rigged my outboard. Why not simplify and put a hatch in the deck above the batteries?
My understanding of CG regs is that fuel components have to be separated from electrical. This was the basis of my mention of a sealed compartment for the fuel line. As for the batteries, they are not under the deck, but at about deck level, only inside the compartment on the port side of the motorwell. Accessing them from the top would be possible but only if the access was from the front and above the batteries. The depth of the compartment is too deep for a top down access.
TomB wrote:
Wed Sep 30, 2020 7:23 pm
Hey Carl,

My fishing boat had a starter battery under a hatch adjacent to the splash well. Add a shelf to get the battery to the top of the compartment and store something under? The boat also had a couple of large deep cycle batteries for the trolling motor. Those were in trays with hold down straps. Open the door, pop the strap and strain to raise the battery an inch to slide it onto the deck for service. There was about 2' of slack in the battery cables. Service for me was twice a year so not to bad. Maybe a nugget you can use. Tom
However, Tom you're mention of mounting the batteries higher would make them more accessible. My main concern is having the battery weight higher up in the boat.

One thought I had was building the port side structure to take up most of the load (rather than sharing it with the bulkhead). Then the bulkhead essentially becomes just a skin to the structure. This would make it easier to make some sort of folding and hinged cover for better access to the batteries. If I was to use this approach, I probably would only strengthen the structure on the battery side and still share most of the load with the bulkhead. Less complicated.

I'm still mulling over options. I forgot to mention that there will be a tray in the compartments for the batteries to set on (since the hull is angled in this area). The tray would be level.

If I could figure out some way to get around the cabin wall paneling interfering with the access to the batteries, I could mount the battery tray on heavy duty slides (like what might be used in a tool box). This would make it easy to slide them out for servicing.
Carl

Crafting a classically styled Vera Cruise

Clipper Boating

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