modified malahini

Designs for inboard or outboard power

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Jimbob
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Re: modified malahini

Post by Jimbob » Thu Jun 06, 2019 11:46 am

Hi Bryan,
I would stick with the sapele and go for a more reddish stain if that's the look you are after.
The picture below is stained with interlux #573 chris craft mahogany, the coverboards are stained with sandusky dark walnut stain. My boat is all sapele.
David at Classic Boat Connection says that interlux # 1579 red mahogany is a more red tint than the #573 that I used. I would try that on some scraps.
Jim
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hull, decks, interior #573. Coverboards, dash, king planks dark walnut.
Jim Neeley
Building a Barrelback in Sacramento, CA
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DrBryanJ
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Re: modified malahini

Post by DrBryanJ » Thu Jun 06, 2019 12:02 pm

Jimbob: I'll have to pick up some stain and try it.
Bryan

Building a malahini "Mona Lisa"

My wife said "If I build a boat, she's getting a divorce."

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billy c
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Re: modified malahini

Post by billy c » Fri Jun 07, 2019 4:40 am

Bryan-
Another option is bleach the Sapele and then stain. Would get any degree of red you want then
Billy
(insert Witty phrase here)
Billy's Belle Isle website

TomB
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Re: modified malahini

Post by TomB » Fri Jun 07, 2019 7:24 am

Bryan,

I started my build with an order of 300 BF of ribbon cut African Mahogany. The color ranges from brown similar to your post to buff. Some is ribbon some is not. Best to lay eyes on what the yard has and go from there. I have also used Santos and the sticks I have are dark almost chocolate in color and hard and oily. A wipe with alcohol to cut the oil before glue and I was good to go. Working with Santos made my shop smell good.

I would select boards in the lighter range and use Interlux #1579 to get to the bloodwood color. Then again, my monitor and yours might be different. :D :D

Tom

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DrBryanJ
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Re: modified malahini

Post by DrBryanJ » Sat Jun 08, 2019 4:34 am

I haven't thought about bleaching and have never tried it. I will have to try things out on some scraps I have to see what I can come up with. Thanks for you help TomB, billy c, and jimbob.
Bryan

Building a malahini "Mona Lisa"

My wife said "If I build a boat, she's getting a divorce."

gdcarpenter
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Re: modified malahini

Post by gdcarpenter » Sat Jun 08, 2019 4:42 am

I bleached the deck planking on my Century Palomino Wine Bar. It gives you much more uniformity in the final stain, I went with an OEM Blonde stain. It took several applications of the acid to get a uniformly bleached deck.
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This is my first, last and only boat build.

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mrintense
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Re: modified malahini

Post by mrintense » Sat Jun 08, 2019 6:00 am

This is a tricky consideration. Whether to stain or not and if so, how to go about it. What makes it tricky is the all or nothing nature of the process. We all have so much time invested in our labors of love and the risk is always, "Will I screw this up?"

I side stepped the issue early on with my build. I had originally considered veneering the entire hull with thin planking after the plywood was installed. My concerns at the time were, threefold. How much extra time and effort would this take, how would I finish it without screwing up, and did I really want a finish that I had to sand and refinish every few years. I eventually decided that painting was the choice for me, given my age and situation.

Obviously, others have different considerations and ambitions. The wooden planked hulls do look gorgeous, and I applaud everyone who does that. They make our lives richer with their art.

As always Bryan, the work you are doing is what makes this such a fun project. I know that whatever choice you make, will be a gem and I look forward to seeing her in whatever form she ends up in.
Carl
a.k.a. Clipper

Crafting a classically styled Vera Cruise

Clipper's Vera Cruise Build

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Re: modified malahini

Post by footer » Mon Jun 10, 2019 4:02 am

Bryan; I hope I'm not chiming in way too late on your screw issue, but if you don't yet have one, get an oscillating saw and buy a carbide blade. You should be able to get under it and cut that screw with it.
When I built my hull, I had screwed it down the the construction framing and after I applied the plywood, I realized I couldn't get to the screws to take them out. So, I basically had the boat bolted to the floor. If it wasn't for that saw, I would have had to destroy something to get it off.

By the way, gdcarpenter, that's a beautiful piece of furniture.

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DrBryanJ
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Re: modified malahini

Post by DrBryanJ » Mon Jun 10, 2019 2:42 pm

I finally got my fuel tank mounted. I have extra moeller tank clips and straps. I have screws for the straps. I am offering them to anyone that wants them for shipping costs. The clips shouldn't be more than $5. THe straps might be $14, but I'll have to check the postage rate. If anyone wants them PM me.
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Bryan

Building a malahini "Mona Lisa"

My wife said "If I build a boat, she's getting a divorce."

Denon Osterman
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Re: modified malahini

Post by Denon Osterman » Tue Jun 18, 2019 8:54 pm

I'm likely chiming in a bit late on the whole "to stain or not to stain" dilema, but I'd say go for it. The worst that can possibly happen is that you mess up literally everything on the way to the final finish, and decide to strip it right down to the bare veneer and start all over again, delaying things by 10% of the overall build time.


Having just done that, I still think it was totally worth it. I don't know if I'll do another "natural finish" boat, as it is a *lot* of effort compared to paint, but I wanted a boat that I could be proud of for decades to come and was willing to take the time (ten years and counting! :shock: ) to get it done. I have only one regret at this stage, and would gladly do it all again! The one regret is that I didn't do *all* of my research beforehand - and that's bitten me in the ass a few times now. You need to ensure you use the right kind of stain for epoxy or whatever other coating you want to finish with, will adhere. If you decide to use epoxy underneath your UV coat (which i'm doing, and recommend), then you need to make sure you use the right kind of epoxy, and apply it in the right way. Etc etc.

Having made literally every mistake possible myself, I'm happy to share what I've learned - feel free to DM me if you want, or ask here - but if I'd done it all "right" the first time it wouldn't have added much time to the overall build for an overall fantastic result. I chose to use rapter fasteneers to hold down 1/8 veneers, embedded on epoxy to my plywood decking - the veneers got stained with WD lockwood water based stain (proven to be OK with epoxy, stupid easy to use, and a myriad of colours), the stain got covered by West 207 (I had bad luck with another brand so decided to bite the bullet and get the "proven" stuff and follow their directions to the letter - and mist with isopropyl), and the West 207 will get covered by a 2 part LPU, so that everything lasts a decade at least.

On that note, Carl (and others) seem to think a stained finish needs more maintenance than anything else - and I'm not sure I agree. I think the durability depends on what the top coat system used is - and a 2 part LPU is about as durable as they get, especially over epoxy. The stain may, over the decades, fade...but so will the colour of my hair, so I don't mind that terribly. Sanding and re finishing is a whole new issue, but the stain plays no part in that (correct me if I'm wrong - but I'd be shocked to hear it!)

Denon

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