At a loss.... fairing

Designs for inboard or outboard power

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Ga-Steve
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At a loss.... fairing

Post by Ga-Steve » Fri Jun 07, 2019 9:12 am

I am really at a loss. Having never done this before and looking at a couple of excellent YouTube videos concerning the chine fairing and then actually going out and doing it. Fairing the bow frames and the sheer clamp are what I am hesitant about. The plans show the sheer being just a small triangle. But do you bevel the edge of frame 4 & 5 before attacking the chine, stem and sheer? I have searched the forum and the web. Maybe I am plugging in the wrong question. Any help or pics/videos are greatly appreciated. I read about people fairing a whole boat in 30-40 hrs.... I go out there for several hrs and don’t accomplish anything. Steve
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JimmY
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Re: At a loss.... fairing

Post by JimmY » Fri Jun 07, 2019 10:02 am

Just remember the goal of fairing is to shape the boat framing (Stem, keel, chines, sheers, and to a lesser extent the frames) so that the plywood skin will fully contact the framing as it is bent into position.

Here are a few photos of my fairing process...
20161110_201018.jpg
I divided the chine, sheer, and stem into equal length segments. Note these segments are not the same length on the different pieces (but the segments are proportional). It looks like I used 7 segments on the Squirt. For the chine I marked the middle lengthwise from the forward frame to the stem and then faired the chine at each segment. You use the angle from the chine to the corresponding segment mark on the stem.
20161110_201556.jpg
It is then just a matter of connecting the dots. Use a board or scrap of plywood to check your progress. The board should lay flat across the chin and stem at each segment. Notice at the bow, the angle on the chine didn't require any fairing and the side and bottom sheeting actually laid flat with each other.
20161113_123616.jpg
Next, repeat this process for the sheer to chine angle. On the Squirt, the sheer ended up being a triangle for most of the length forward of the frames. Notice all the shavings and the power planer ($75 on Craigslist, and I can sell it to the next guy if I want to). Some guys use a belt sander, just be careful. I think the power planer was easier to control. Not shown is my #4 hand plane, rasps, and sanding blocks.

As far as the frames go, if they end up being proud of the sheer or chine start knocking them down. It is not important that the frames contact the plywood, and can cause cracking if the frames are stressing the plywood too much. On my Squirt, the forward frame (#2?) does not touch the side plywood at all. On the bottom, the plywood does touch each frame and the frames are fair with the battens, keel, and chine.

I hope this helps.
Last edited by JimmY on Fri Jun 07, 2019 10:06 am, edited 2 times in total.
-Jim
Nothing says poor craftsmanship like wrinkles in your duct tape!

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Re: At a loss.... fairing

Post by footer » Fri Jun 07, 2019 10:05 am

Personally, I beveled my frame and chine at the same time when I got to that frame. Same with the sheer. Although you are beveling the front edge your frame, the aft edge of it is going to remain the same and have the same line right through the chine and sheer.
Looks like your on track with your starboard chine.

Ga-Steve
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Re: At a loss.... fairing

Post by Ga-Steve » Fri Jun 07, 2019 1:33 pm

Thanks guys. Big help. On the Outrage, the bottom planking rest on the battens and is easily understood. From frame 4 forward.... didn’t really know where to start. Just looking at the patterns, the sheer will be almost nothing. Plans call for another lamination on the inside because of it. Steve

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BarnacleMike
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Re: At a loss.... fairing

Post by BarnacleMike » Fri Jun 07, 2019 2:01 pm

The lamination on the inside to reinforce the chine or sheer is no big deal. Even laminating extra pieces on the outside is VERY common, especially on the chine.

If you get a fairly big piece of plywood... like maybe one of the 2 x 2 things they sell at Lowes... and clamp it into place & then bend it over the frames & battens where the planking will go, then it's easy to visualize where & how you'll need to fair stuff. Just take your time, and check & measure often. Fairing is a frustratingly long & boring part of the process, but you'll regret it later if you rush it now.
-Michael

"How long does it take to build a boat? Until it's finished" — yours truly

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mrintense
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Re: At a loss.... fairing

Post by mrintense » Sat Jun 08, 2019 6:12 am

I agree with the other assessments and suggestions here. This is an area where measure twice and cut once is extremely important. It took me 4 months to fair my Vera Cruise, mostly because I spent a lot of time just thinking about certain aspects of the process. But also because in a couple of places I did rush into it and then had to make corrections. Like Jimmy says, the ultimate goal is to make the exterior look like a skeletal version of the skin with no hard points. Using different sizes of plywood (similar to the skin's thickness) will help here, keeping in mind that larger pieces are more flexible and easier to form over the curves than shorter pieces. So be sure to use big and small pieces when checking.
Carl
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Crafting a classically styled Vera Cruise

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Hercdrvr
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Re: At a loss.... fairing

Post by Hercdrvr » Sat Jun 08, 2019 7:29 am

I too was confused about fairing in the beginning. Then the lightbulb clicked on and I rather enjoy the process now. Make the plywood lie flat on all the framework with the tool of your choice, I like a belt sander with 36 grit, that’s all there is to it.

Its was scary at first because I wasn’t comfortable hogging off so much material, especially up front.
Matt B
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One of my more aggressive fairing tools

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kens
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Re: At a loss.... fairing

Post by kens » Sat Jun 08, 2019 3:15 pm

As I faired going forward, the sheer became a small triangle, I laminated layers to the inside to regain thickness and strength in the sheer.
I think many others do the same, correct?
Oak is over rated, everything about it takes extra time; then it warps, splits or checks !!! :roll:

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Bill Edmundson
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Re: At a loss.... fairing

Post by Bill Edmundson » Sat Jun 08, 2019 3:40 pm

Just like Ken, I added material on the inside.

Bill
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footer
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Re: At a loss.... fairing

Post by footer » Mon Jun 10, 2019 3:29 am

I bought a Ryobi power planer and love it's control. It's not for everything, but twice I was paying too much attention to one angle and took too much off another with my sander. So, I had to epoxy a strip back on it and plane it back to where it was supposed to be. (not taking away the importance of the belt sander, though).

Sarnian
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Re: At a loss.... fairing

Post by Sarnian » Mon Jun 10, 2019 10:24 am

I'll second all that's been said - I laminated on the inside at the fore end of the sheers - and used a bunch of different tools. I bought a shinto saw rasp online (I think it was ~$15) - and found it to be fantastic for roughing out reference points along the way and for finer shaping. Seemed to be more aggressive than a rasp to me, but also quite easy to control.

Ga-Steve
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Re: At a loss.... fairing

Post by Ga-Steve » Mon Jun 10, 2019 5:17 pm

I really appreciate all the replies. I, too, have numerous tools I’ve picked up through the years. Power plane does excellent. I have learned that pulling a block plane instead of pushing does real good. Low angle Jack plane. 36 grit belt sander. Just scared, I guess

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kens
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Re: At a loss.... fairing

Post by kens » Mon Jun 10, 2019 5:44 pm

Take a hand plane, drill & tap 2 holes on its side, make yourself a long leg of hardwood that sticks out the side, long enough to lay on the adjacent longitudinal, attach it to said holes, this long leg gives you a means to keep the hand-plane on the geographic-plane where you want to be.
Oak is over rated, everything about it takes extra time; then it warps, splits or checks !!! :roll:

Ga-Steve
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Re: At a loss.... fairing

Post by Ga-Steve » Mon Jun 10, 2019 7:11 pm

Now that is a great idea

Sarnian
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Re: At a loss.... fairing

Post by Sarnian » Tue Jun 11, 2019 6:48 am

see here for a video on this method that kens mentions:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HWVOrIihpBI

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