Mist Miss - Desert Build

Designs for inboard or outboard power

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mrintense
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Re: Mist Miss - Desert Build

Post by mrintense »

Agreed. And depending upon your ability to see the hull shape, the fairing is going to take time as well. If you try to build on a time line, you are going to hate it after awhile (sort of like working at that point). Set goals yes, but mostly just consistently work on it .
Carl

Crafting a classically styled Vera Cruise

Clipper Boating

Ga-Steve
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Re: Mist Miss - Desert Build

Post by Ga-Steve »

I can’t imagine those temps. Here in Ga we have been in the mid 90’s for some time and the humidity has been unbearable. I drip water like standing in the shower. Your build has been quiet interesting.looking good. Scarf joints were very fun for me too. Steve

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acflynn
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Re: Mist Miss - Desert Build

Post by acflynn »

Thanks Matt, Lee, Carl, and Steve,

Matt, Lee, Carl - I guess you're right, in that I shouldn't have "timelines", as I've already blown through a few so far. But (as Carl mentioned) I'm still holding on to a "goal" of doing the flip around New Year's, and will work towards that. The month-by-month breakdown was more of me laying out the next major tasks. I suspect that everything will indeed take longer than estimated, just from the variances and vicissitudes of life. That being said, having that goal keeps me going out daily and completing some tasks in a methodical order and pace, even if the heat limits it to 60-90 minute daily work sessions.

Lee - the Mist Miss is plywood, not cold moulded, so that should be a bit of time-saver. I'll have a thicker hull, so 1/2" in the stern, and two layers of 1/4" at the bow. And since I plan on having a bright finish (with some striping) I'm considering adding a layer of veneers to give it a "planked" look. One thing that has bothered me about some plywood builds I have seen is the visible delineation of plywood sheets. That's diminished with stain or paint, obviously, but it's something I'll consider. So now I'm realizing that I too may have areas of three layers.

Steve, I'm not so sure I would trade temps with you. Yes 118 degrees is a bit much (we've set or tied records each of the last four days, and July 2020 was the hottest month on record here), it's been with our typically "dry" humidity. Rarely does it get above 20% on a normal day, and even when the summer monsoons come, it bumps the humidity up to 50%, but drops the temperatures by 15 degrees. I don't believe I would survive a typical southern summer with 90+% humidity. Having a strong enough fan works pretty well (except for blowing sawdust back into my face), as it helps dry off.

The one gross thing is wearing latex gloves for epoxying. Just rivers of sweat running down my arm within minutes. I've even borrowed my son's little league sweat bands, just to keep from dripping onto the boat! Gaaack!
Slowly building a Mist Miss in the Arizona desert

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acflynn
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Re: Mist Miss - Desert Build

Post by acflynn »

Today's accomplishment: I got the keel layed in.

Not attached, mind you, but it fits completely, after some work with my keel notches on some frames (too tight tolerances on my part - needed to be widened by 1/16" of an inch) and finally was able to trim the excess and get the keel fitted snugly into the stem notch, with a stylish taper as well. I'm using the 1/4" ply backing for "padding" as recommended in the plans. Tomorrow I'll start bonding and screwing the keel to the frames, as well as bolt the keel to the stem.

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Slowly building a Mist Miss in the Arizona desert

Ga-Steve
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Re: Mist Miss - Desert Build

Post by Ga-Steve »

“The one gross thing is wearing latex gloves for epoxying. Just rivers of sweat running down my arm within minutes. I've even borrowed my son's little league sweat bands, just to keep from dripping onto the boat! Gaaack!“

Yes, you can pour out a cup full when you take your gloves off. I was painting my seats in the catport yesterday and sweat running down my arm was like standing in a shower. I’d wipe my arms and brow, make 4-5 swipes with the brush, and do it all again.

Your build is looking good. Feels good when frames ,stem and transom are finally attached to the keelson. Even better when the skin is on. Steve

Hercdrvr
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Re: Mist Miss - Desert Build

Post by Hercdrvr »

I dont have time for timelines.
Matt B

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acflynn
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Re: Mist Miss - Desert Build

Post by acflynn »

Ha! - good idea, Matt

Keel is in! Poxy-Gripped and screwed (2 per frame) and the keel is carriage-bolted to the stem. It's still 107 degrees, and it's 8:00 PM, and I'm calling it a night!

I still need to decide if I'm going to use bungs or filler (famowood) or thickened/colored epoxy to fill those screw holes in the keel. Some will be faired off, though, so maybe I hold off on filling until towards the end of fairing?

Also, I may take tomorrow off just to contemplate the chine. I'm looking at my logs and I've put in work on the boat for 14 straight days. But now it's such a habit/groove I'll probably putter around anyway and end up starting the chines.

Cheers!
-Andrew
Slowly building a Mist Miss in the Arizona desert

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mrintense
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Re: Mist Miss - Desert Build

Post by mrintense »

Waiting til after fairing is no big deal. Either way, they are going to be covered over.


As for working everyday, well just do a little bit occasionally. Don't want to get burned out.
Carl

Crafting a classically styled Vera Cruise

Clipper Boating

denbrlr
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Re: Mist Miss - Desert Build

Post by denbrlr »

Andrew,

I found that thickened epoxy doesn't work well to fill screw holes. I tried to do that for a couple on screw holes on my Monaco keel and it just doesn't seem to work. It is hard to get the hole filled and you end up with a dimple. I suggest using bungs and I would do that before fairing. In my opinion, wood filler works okay for smaller holes but keel screw holes are pretty big and deep. I made my bungs by taking a piece of wood scrap lumber and turning it on my bench belt sander by hand but you have to pay attention doing this. It actually worked better than I thought to make them that way.

Lee

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acflynn
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Re: Mist Miss - Desert Build

Post by acflynn »

Thanks Carl and Lee,

At this point I think bungs might be the way to go, just because of the depth. I used Famowood for covering the screws on the transom and floor timbers on the frames, but those were in-plywood counter-sinks where the #8 screw heads sank themselves (and thus the holes weren't that deep).

With the #14 keel screws (and deeper holes needed due to possible fairing interference), I'll have to go bigger. Fortunately I have plenty of scrap to experiment with.
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Fairly deep 5/16" carriage bolt holes for the connection between the stem and the keel - the whole head of the keel is slathered in Poxy-Grip, which will be mostly faired off anyway.

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Typical of hole for keel-to-frame attachment (two 3" #14 screws). Some wax residue is still visible in there (used the tried-and-true wax toilet ring to provide for strip-free entry of the silicon bronze screws)

In terms of progress, today I had to go out and purchase some more Sapele mahogany. I thought I had enough ripped for the chines, sheer timbers, and battens, but unfortunately after review and a spell in the "chair of contemplation", I realized that all of that was S4S 4/4 stock - 13/16" thickness. That will be fine for the sheer and battens, but the chines for the Mist Miss have to be 1-1/8" x 2" (by 18 feet).

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My supplier only had three pieces over 8', and let's just say they were more curvaceous than expected. in order to get four 10' pieces, I had to essentially purchase three timbers (18.6 board feet) to ensure that I had straight pieces. I gladly paid the milling fee (around $17) to get them planed down from 6/4 down to the 1-1/8" specified, and their steadier hands at precision ripping were worth it. So it looks like the next few days I'll be setting up a scarfing station for those, along with looking at possible steaming options for the bow area for both chine and sheer. As a mock-up, I was able to clamp the 4/4 boards to follow the transom-to-frame 4 curve, but that's thinner and an easier arc. It seems daunting bending that 5/4 Sapele for the bow.
Slowly building a Mist Miss in the Arizona desert

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