Slither build in GA

Designs for inboard or outboard power

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chugalug
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Re: Slither build in GA

Post by chugalug »

Picked up this kit for another project.Around 100 bucks for gal kit.supposed to be sandable after 1/2 hour.Epoxy fairing compound. :D
IMG_1659.JPG
1:1 mix each one is different color so mix is the color of the 2 combined
Working on regular-sized Bo-Jest


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electric tug
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Re: Slither build in GA

Post by electric tug »

hi!
have been looking at your build progress pics, looks great! are you building the 6° or 12° version? did you stretch it 18' ? :D

I really like this design too. It looks a lot bigger in your pics. I admit I have not read all your posts yet but will go back and see whats written.

Have my eye on a couple designs such as this one but haven't decided on one yet.
I wish there was some footage somewhere of a jet drive version... :(

Doug

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sshamilt@gmail.com
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Re: Slither build in GA

Post by sshamilt@gmail.com »

Thanks for that info Chug. I was thinking about the fairing of the sheer/chine/keel and decided that there is a slight dip (as in like 1/16 inch) then I will not worry about that til I get to the skin, then I will fair out the skin. I have faired my share of sheetrock and the process has to be similar. I was looking at the West System epoxy but this will get put on the supply list also.

Thanks Tug. My posts have been more for advise than showing the journey like most have. I was looking at the ski boat (i think. that was a year ago) then it struck me that I better measure the garage door opening. Good thing I did. The initial plan would not have fit out the door. I think my wife would have had some heartburn if I had to remove part of the wall to get the boat out!!
I did choose the 18' version with the 12 degree vee.

No pictures but I did manage to get out yesterday for a couple of hours and do some fairing on the keel. Using the electric planer with the guide bar made it simple enough to walk the length of the keel for each pass. It did get to the back a bit leaning over that far. But i have the keel down to about 1/8 inch of where it needs to be. The keel is white oak and i am not able to sharpen my plane well enough to cut it smoothly. That and the grain is wonky (technical term). A lot have mentioned a sanding board. I can imaging a 5 foot straight board with 40 grit on the end and a lot of back and forth.

Two questions:
1. What do you put the sand paper on with? Double sided tape i use for woodworking is going to be way to sticky to get it off.
2. What is the removal rate? I am debating trying a couple of more passes with the planer.
Last edited by sshamilt@gmail.com on Sun Apr 04, 2021 6:30 pm, edited 1 time in total.
Steve

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Roberta
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Re: Slither build in GA

Post by Roberta »

Some shorter long boards have clamps to secure the paper. For Longer boards you need to get sticky back rolls and cut to length. 60 or 80 grit for fairly aggressive sanding. Change paper often.

My Longer board (24") has a flexible steel bed that holds paper well but peels easy enough.

Roberta
Roberta "Queen of the Boat Builders"
Built Zip "Oliver IV", Super Spartan "Jimmy 70", and Torpedo "The Glen L".

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kens
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Re: Slither build in GA

Post by kens »

Personally, I would fair the chines/sheers/battens such that the fairing (filler) to the outside skin is non-existant.
Even though you may fair drywall, I'll gaurantee epoxy filler is a bear to sand compared to drywall putty.
also, heaven forbid if you are sanding ply filler and cut through to the wood, ,,wood is softer than epoxy and you immediately get a low spot in the wood and you get to re-start that process.
Oak..........the juice ain't worth the squeeze :D :shock: :o :)

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sshamilt@gmail.com
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Re: Slither build in GA

Post by sshamilt@gmail.com »

Roberta, are you making or buying the boards?

Kens, I did not think about the hardness difference. You are right. I can see going through the veneers pretty easy.
Steve

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Roberta
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Re: Slither build in GA

Post by Roberta »

I purchased the longboards I have. There are many sizes and types out there as well as plans to make them. Choose something that looks like it would work well for you and your application. I do not like overly long ones as they take a lot of energy to use.

Roberta :D
Roberta "Queen of the Boat Builders"
Built Zip "Oliver IV", Super Spartan "Jimmy 70", and Torpedo "The Glen L".

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kens
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Re: Slither build in GA

Post by kens »

Here is a sundry of stuff off my sanding shelf. The purchased sanding boards will never be replaced, its too easy to make that stuff up out of scraps, and make 'em fit what you need, when you need it, and mostly, fit the sandpaper you got handy.
The ply longboard in the back is my favorite of the flattening boards, I don't necessarily use it all the time, but use it to verify as I go along.
The little D-handle 6" board is a good one.
The 8" geared-pneumatic mud-hog is the go-to machine. It makes your 6" DA (orbital) into a kids toy.
Don't forget sanding belts can be cut up into long strips.
Don't forget you can get hardwood-floor-sander-machine belts too, (now thats a novel piece of sandpaper)
I got foam hand pads for nearly every size sandpaper there is, long strips, narrow strips, radius, 6", 8", half sizes, radius,
You can use a piece of plexiglass, sheet plastic, plywood, you make this stuff up as you go.
Staple gun, heavy paper clips, stir sticks, popcickle sticks,
oh, the feathering disc adhesive. That is a snotty glue you use with plain back paper to stick it onto a hard surface like metal or plexi, and it holds the paper but you can replace the sandpaper. it would also work on a hard face foam too
20210404_195000_resized.jpg
Oak..........the juice ain't worth the squeeze :D :shock: :o :)

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sshamilt@gmail.com
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Re: Slither build in GA

Post by sshamilt@gmail.com »

That is quite an assortment of sanding tools. When long boards were mentioned I pictured 36 - 40 inches with paper on one end then spanning from chine to keel that you could sand one then the other. These are similar to the various hand plane lengths. Ok this makes sense.
Steve

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kens
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Re: Slither build in GA

Post by kens »

sshamilt@gmail.com wrote:
Sun Apr 04, 2021 5:50 pm
That is quite an assortment of sanding tools. When long boards were mentioned I pictured 36 - 40 inches with paper on one end then spanning from chine to keel that you could sand one then the other. These are similar to the various hand plane lengths. Ok this makes sense.
I'm not following your thought process,
40" chine to keel, you say? I'm not following
you mean fairing longitudinals, or, sanding the planked hull?
Oak..........the juice ain't worth the squeeze :D :shock: :o :)

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sshamilt@gmail.com
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Re: Slither build in GA

Post by sshamilt@gmail.com »

Longitudinal. I am weeks from the skins.
Steve

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kens
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Re: Slither build in GA

Post by kens »

sshamilt@gmail.com wrote:
Sun Apr 04, 2021 7:47 pm
Longitudinal. I am weeks from the skins.
Are you looking at longitudinals from keel-to-batten-to-chine or,
each of longitudinals from frame-to-frame-to-frame?
Oak..........the juice ain't worth the squeeze :D :shock: :o :)

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sshamilt@gmail.com
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Re: Slither build in GA

Post by sshamilt@gmail.com »

My initial long board question was dealing with the Keel/Batten/Chine fairing but I also have to at the same time manage the frame to frame. So my thought here was to do the keel/batten/chine while periodically checking the frame to frame to catch any dips. I have to remove about 1/8th inch on the keel and perhaps 1/16 on the chine to get the battens in line. I may have to shim the battens up a small amount as I think at least on frame was cut too deep.
Steve

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Roberta
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Re: Slither build in GA

Post by Roberta »

Frame to frame fair is dictated by the longitudinal pieces. Typically the transom and aft frames are flat between keel and chines with the "V" of the bottom becoming steeper as you move forward. This progressively changes the angle at which you need to fair as you move forward. You don't need a longboard to fair between longitudinals but rather a flat stick to place between them to establish the angle at various locations. The frames will show the angle at their location and fairing is progressive between them.

Battens should be even with frames or a little proud. Planking is fastened to longitudinal pieces and not frames.

If you fair a bit too much, glue in a lam and re-fair.

Roberta
Roberta "Queen of the Boat Builders"
Built Zip "Oliver IV", Super Spartan "Jimmy 70", and Torpedo "The Glen L".

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sshamilt@gmail.com
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Re: Slither build in GA

Post by sshamilt@gmail.com »

Day 4 of fairing the bow. To be more honest hour 7.
I got a 16" long board that works good for the first 2 feet. Took a 3' scrap to use also. It allows me to span a batten to maintain the angle on the keel.
16185229151685915904674865865578.jpg
I still have my reservations on the very front side skins. To lay flat on the sheer and chine is going to give that section a concave curve which should not work.
Steve

Long time woodworker, first time boat builder

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