new the forum and first time boat builder

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Ed Phillips
Posts: 44
Joined: Mon Jun 29, 2020 11:10 am
Location: Michigan

Re: new the forum and first time boat builder

Post by Ed Phillips »

Now for the bottom installation update. I simply clamped a 4 X 8 sheet of plywood on the bottom of the boat and lined the edge of the plywood to the centerline of the keel. Trace a line along the chine and with some pressure at least partially bend the plywood over the stem and down as close as you can to the chine up by the breasthook and continue your trace. Remove and retrace your line adding 2" and cut. Flip it to the other side of the sheet, trace, and cut and now you have both bottom blanks. As I did with the sides I also pre-molded them with clamps, rope, rags, and hot water. See pic #1. As this plywood is bent and molded into place the edge of the plywood will take a immediate bend sideways. See pic #2 Notice how far past the stem centerline the edge of the plywood is. Again as before soak with hot water, tighten clamps and in this case ropes as well, re-soak with hot water, tighten and let set overnight. Next day remove the wet rages and let sit another night. By now the bottom should have a pretty good bend in it and you can start to work with it. I put a couple waxed screws in along the keel and a couple along the transom, this was done to keep everything in place as I removed the clamps and ropes. With the clamps and ropes removed now chop some of that excess off the plywood so that what you have remaining is about 2 or 3 inches past the centerline and 2 or 3 inches below the intersecting point of the side board. The next steps I followed v-driver instructions and they worked wonderfully. The only thing I will add is I did put washers under my screws and waxed them as well as I went over the stem for ease of removal. Also I chalked the plywood joint between the bottom and the side plywood which I found easier than tracing as v-driver suggests.

The following is v-driver's step by step procedure;

mark the keel and stem on a precise centerline.
Make sure the transition joint is ready on the side planking; from the stem center to the rearmost point of the transition joint, it is to butt the bottom and must be planed to mate along the center of the chine. From this point rearward to the transom, it must be planed down to permit the bottom ply to overlap - that is, make it fair/flush with the chine face that mates to the bottom ply.
Set one ply bottom sheet exactly along the keel centerline and temporarily screw it in place; a couple of screws in the keel will do; plus, have two or three REALLY HEAVY weights (I used 6" long sections of railroad iron) to hold the ply down between the screws; put a couple of screws in the transom.
Don't put any screws too far forward in the keel - no closer than about 18" of the base of the stem; this allows you to lift and fit the ply sheet.
Trace the chine shape of the ply leaving a generous excess overhang- 2" or 3" at least; this is to reduce the mass of the ply to make it more "handle-able". I used a cabinetmakers offset scribe but a short batten with a through-hole to secure a pencil located about 3" from the end will work, too.
Remove the ply bottom and trim the excess; do this trimming off of the boat to avoid marring the side planking - don't ask how I know! Refasten the ply bottom as before.
Now the fun begins...
Start bending the ply onto the faired chine and forward frames, fastening with temporary screws at close enough intervals to hold it at the chine - but remember that you're going to have to remove every one of them, so you don't want to drill and screw like you're gluing it - yet!
When it starts to bend into shape - STOP! It's time to get out the hand plane and start shaping the edge along the keel center line.
Plane the forward, inner edge of the ply bottom and make it fit the keel center-line mark a little at a time. It's a trick to cut the ply bottom edge down so the mark is exposed at the rear-most crossover point and to work forward. Go slowly to avoid removing too much at the keel center-line mark. You can always plane more away, but you can't add it back!
As you move forward exposing the center line, coordinate another fastener into the chine, bending the bottom into shape as you slowly inch forward.
Bend - fasten - plane - expose the mark - bend - fasten - plane - you get the idea.

OK by now you should have a nicely finished edge going over the sheer with a few waxed screws to hold it in place and a nice joint along the chine as well with a few waxed screws to hold it in place. I took this opportunity to measure and lay out all my remaining screw locations so during final installation all I was doing was drilling and screwing. So you can now remove the bottom plywood and get ready to do the other side. Your plywood should look something like this pic #3
OK assuming you have both sides fit now the next step I took was epoxying and installing one of the sides permanently by installing all the screws. I did start at the front installing both the stem and the chine screws as I worked up to the flat part of the bottom.
Attachments
Remi's boat battom showing bend at stem.jpg
Remi's boat bottom with clamps no rags.jpg
Remi's boat bottom with clamps and wet rags.jpg

Ed Phillips
Posts: 44
Joined: Mon Jun 29, 2020 11:10 am
Location: Michigan

Re: new the forum and first time boat builder

Post by Ed Phillips »

Assuming you have both sides fit the next step I took was epoxying and installing one of the sides permanently by installing all the screws. I did start at the front installing both the stem and the chine screws as I worked up to the flat part of the bottom. Once you have them both installed they should look something like pic#1.
I let the epoxy sit over night and then planed, and sanded the chine line as well as the transom. Should look something like pic#2 and pic#3
Off to fairing compound next.
Attachments
Remi's boat bottom side view.jpg
Remi's boat bottom front view.jpg
Remi's boat with bottom on it but not screwed down yet.jpg

Ed Phillips
Posts: 44
Joined: Mon Jun 29, 2020 11:10 am
Location: Michigan

Re: new the forum and first time boat builder

Post by Ed Phillips »

OK after 4 skin coats of fairing compound, combined with a few hours of filing, followed by sanding, I am calling the fairing portion of this project done. The areas at the bow and along the chime joint I applied the fairing compound a little heavier, which with the aid of a body file allowed me to not only fill in the screws holes, as well as the seam, but to shape that edge some as well. I used Total Fair brand which is a 50/50 mix. One is blue and the other is yellow and when it is mixed it turns green, which was a nice benefit to assure it was completely mixed. See pictures
Attachments
Fairing end view.jpg
Fairing side view.jpg
Fairing front view .jpg

Ed Phillips
Posts: 44
Joined: Mon Jun 29, 2020 11:10 am
Location: Michigan

Re: new the forum and first time boat builder

Post by Ed Phillips »

OK I finally flipped her over and started working on the inside. See pic 1. I added a small flat piece of marine plywood in front of the number 2 frame so it's kind of like a rope locker now, except I plan on placing a battery up there to power the DC trolling motor which should be just about right for a 5 year old. See pic 2. I then moved to the section between frame 1 and frame 2 and decided to install a tongue and groove hickory floor so my grandson didn't have to stand on the raise keel or batten boards. But due to the more pronounced angle of frame 2 than frame one I had to add a shim to level it out. I made it the width of the keel and it starts out a 3/4" and tapers to zero 12" away. See pic 3
Attachments
Remi's boat shim for floor boards.jpg
Remi's boat rope locker board IMG_0152.jpg
Remi boat bare inside view .jpg

Ed Phillips
Posts: 44
Joined: Mon Jun 29, 2020 11:10 am
Location: Michigan

Re: new the forum and first time boat builder

Post by Ed Phillips »

OK with the shim added I started to hand fit the hickory boards up tight to the chime and butt jointed them at the keel. Nothing is held down yet because I plan on painting the underside and then probably poly the top. Because there could be some water captured under the hickory from my grandson getting in and out at the sand bar I added 2 small holes next to frame 1 See pic 1. I ordered a small hand suction pump that I will attach under the overhang of the seat so water can be pumped out of the holes as necessary. I then added what I am calling the seat bottom and the storage spot behind the seat back, which is not built yet. I also added two small holes next to the transom again to pump out any water that may collect. See pic 2 The carlings are also hickory and I made them 4 inches wide rather than the called out 2 1/2" because I knew I was going to have a wider dash and I wanted the transition to be smooth. The dash is oak and I mounted as far forward as I could and still install the helm so there would be as much floor space as I could get out of this little boat because my grandson isn't going to be 5 forever. See pic 3
Attachments
Inside of Remi's boat with no back seat.jpg
Drain holes in back of Remi's boat.jpg
Remi's boat floor with drain holes.jpg

Ed Phillips
Posts: 44
Joined: Mon Jun 29, 2020 11:10 am
Location: Michigan

Re: new the forum and first time boat builder

Post by Ed Phillips »

The helm I choose is a Uflex (see pic 1. I choose this style because they claim less room needed behind the dash and that was important to me and I seen where someone ran an inch pound test on the conventional off center helms verses this center drive style and it was considerably easier to turn. This was also important to me because a 5 year old will be steering. The steering wheel is a 11 inch unit off Amazon. see pic 2. The steering cable is 8 foot and it just barely fits and I had to push the cable down next to the chime between frame 1 and the transom just to take up a little more slack, but as you can see it's in there. Now I just have to get a tube and mount it.
Attachments
Inside of Remi's boat with no back seat.jpg
Remi's boat Helm.jpg

hoodman
Posts: 2760
Joined: Thu Nov 10, 2011 8:48 am
Location: Lafayette, IN

Re: new the forum and first time boat builder

Post by hoodman »

Nice job! I'm interested to see how you make that all work with the trolling motor.
Matt

Building a Geronimo......!
viewtopic.php?f=2&t=25139

Ed Phillips
Posts: 44
Joined: Mon Jun 29, 2020 11:10 am
Location: Michigan

Re: new the forum and first time boat builder

Post by Ed Phillips »

Thanks Matt, I have it all worked out in my head I just need to implement it and see if I uncover any issue

Ed Phillips
Posts: 44
Joined: Mon Jun 29, 2020 11:10 am
Location: Michigan

Re: new the forum and first time boat builder

Post by Ed Phillips »

Well I finally got the remote speed control finished and mounted for the 12 volt DC trolling motor. Originally I intended to purchase a switch and just wire to it, but finding something that accommodated the requirements was considerably harder than I anticipated. The switch needed to be capable of reverse polarity for forward and reverse, multiple resistance positions for differing speeds. lever actuated, and be suitable for marine applications. I also theorize that this little DC motor will probably only be around for a couple years and then my grandson will want a gas powered unit. So for those reason I decided to use the existing switch and design and modify as needed. Luckily I just happen to have an old trolling motor laying around that the bearings had gone bad in so it became the donor unit. I first started by mounting the switch in a treated 2 X 4, see pic1. The switch is driven by a plastic disk and I had to relieve a portion of the wood on both the 2 X 4 mount and the board I mounted it to, to accommodate this disk. see pic2. This picture is of the board I mounted the switch to but I had to relieve the 2 X 4 as well. The disk is held in place by two molded pieces of plastic in the trolling motor housing which I just cut out with the aid of a Dremel and mounted them and the disk to the 2 X 4 block. see pic 3.
Attachments
Trolling motor horizantal retainer plate.jpg
Trolling motor disk releif in wood.jpg
Trolling motor switch mount in wood.jpg

Ed Phillips
Posts: 44
Joined: Mon Jun 29, 2020 11:10 am
Location: Michigan

Re: new the forum and first time boat builder

Post by Ed Phillips »

OK in the previous post you can see in picture 3 I bent the aluminum drive rod in the attempt to convert the twisting action of the original design into a lever style action commonly found on boats. Well that didn't work because although the retaining pieces I cut out of the motor housing and remounted to the 2 X 4 held the disk in place and kept it from moving horizontally the forward action of the lever put unacceptable vertical pressure on it even with the aid of the support of the hole going through the board I mounted it to. So I scraped that idea and remounted the disk and aluminum rod again but this time I added a support bearing to the outside of the mounting board to address the overhung load. The bearing I used was a Igus EF01-10R which is an all Polymer bearing so marine applicable with a 5/8" bore. However, the aluminum shaft is not round it is U shaped so I had to file flats on the inside of the bearing so this shape would slide through. See pic 1. Now with the aid of the outboard support bearing I simply screwed it to the outside of my mounting board, cut the aluminum shaft off about 3" from the bearing, drilled and taped a hole for the handle. See pic 2. I added a sealed 4 wire connector to the trolling motor so I can remove it easily for winter storage. See pic 3
Attachments
Connector to trolling motor.jpg
Trolling motor speed switch handle.jpg
Trolling motor U shaped aluminum shaft.jpg

Ed Phillips
Posts: 44
Joined: Mon Jun 29, 2020 11:10 am
Location: Michigan

Re: new the forum and first time boat builder

Post by Ed Phillips »

Now this only leaves cleaning up the trolling motor because I didn't want a big long handle sticking out of it nor did I want a big hole in it so I put a dowel rod in the middle of a hot tub hose and when I screwed the top back on the trolling motor it pinched it in place See pic 1
Now I probably should have stated this in the beginning but the forward motion control originally on the trolling motor was a twist clockwise. AND the forward control motion with a lever actuation is counter clockwise, basically if you push the lever forward you back up. But luckily we are dealing with DC here so it is just a simple switch of the positive and negative wired in the back of the switch and then you go in the right direction. There is one last thing to note and that is with the change in polarity you now have 3 speeds forward and 5 reverse but having more choices backing up might be a good thing for a 5 year old? The last couple pictures are where I am at now. In the process of designing and modifying the steering linkage now on the trolling motor so it hooks up with the helm drive system previously mentioned
Attachments
Interior view Remi's boat.jpg
Rear seat view Remi's boat.jpg
Trolling motor no handle.jpg

Jim Anderson
Posts: 32
Joined: Mon Dec 07, 2020 5:07 pm
Location: American Samoa

Re: new the forum and first time boat builder

Post by Jim Anderson »

I've been studying the Glen-L website since 2006 when I first started considering building a boat. Now that I'm retired and returned to living in American Samoa, I'm building the 15-1/2' Power Skiff for recreational fishing in the harbor, lagoons, and off-shore in calm weather. I've got everything from Glen-L, hardwood, and an entire shop of tools being shipped ocean freight to start the project. Excited, but a little nervous as well. Can't think of anything better than to build my own boat. Jim Anderson, Pago Pago, American Samoa

Ed Phillips
Posts: 44
Joined: Mon Jun 29, 2020 11:10 am
Location: Michigan

Re: new the forum and first time boat builder

Post by Ed Phillips »

Welcome to the boat builders forum Jim, you might want to start your own series or logs so they are unique to your build.

I intended to work on the steering linkage but the parts got held up in NJ somewhere so I moved on the to strongback installation. Now this is where some basic geometry caught me by surprise. First off I did match the arc of the number 2 frame to the dash as well as the intermediate deck beam. However, the original design called out for the dash to be vertical, and I choose to mount mine at a slight angle. As I said I was not thinking about the geometry, so this tilting decision lowered the height of the crown down. Which in my case lowered the height by about 1/4" as compared to the number 2 frame. So I would suggest anyone that does the same should tilt your dash to whatever angle you want and calculate how much arc you are going to loose compared to the number 2 frame and adjust accordingly. At the point in the build I am at I simply choose to plane off the last couple inches of the strongback to make it match the reduced arc of the dash. I also did not notch out the dash because I didn't like the idea of putting a notch in my nice oak dash so I simply screwed and glued a mounting block to the back of the dash. See picture 1. My instructions use the words " notches around the breasthook" which was confusing to me but I figured they meant notch into breasthook, so that's what I did. Now it's worth noting that the strongback basically lays flat on the breasthook once the number 2 frame is notched as well as the intermediate deck beam. But just like the shear clamps and the chine the strongback will bend into the breasthook notch. My strongback is 3/4" thick so I notched the breasthook 5/8" deep and faired it into the breasthook. See picture 3. Picture 2 is an overview of the strongback, intermediate beam, and it's blocking as well as the transition into the dash.
Attachments
Strongback to breasthook intersection.jpg
view of strongback and breasthook .jpg
support for strongback at dash.jpg

Ed Phillips
Posts: 44
Joined: Mon Jun 29, 2020 11:10 am
Location: Michigan

Re: new the forum and first time boat builder

Post by Ed Phillips »

Well my Teleflex bracket made it out of NJ so I worked on hooking up the steering to the DC trolling motor. Now Teleflex along with other manufactures make different styles of linkages, I picked the 300616 style which just happens to be listed as an inboard setup but it meant my requirements. I then had to make the motor brackets and the link between the bracket and the end of the steering linkage. Please see pictures. Now the trolling motor pivot point is outside the transom so it has a larger sweep when you tilt or trim the motor and with this setup it will not easily trim. But luckily the trolling motor is designed to pull straight up as well so when my grandson gets into really shallow water to get out of the boat he or more than likely his dad can simply pull the motor straight up and lock it in place there. As I have previously mentioned in 1 or 2 years I plan to change to a 9.9 HP Evinrude where the pivot point is inside the transom and should tilt or trim easily.
I need to paint under the floor boards and up under the bow before I install the decking but according to my paint it needs to be above 50 degrees before I start so because it's December in Michigan painting might be on hold until spring.
Attachments
Trolling motor bracket side view.jpg
Trolling motor bracket close up.jpg
Trolling motor bracket close up rear view.jpg

Ed Phillips
Posts: 44
Joined: Mon Jun 29, 2020 11:10 am
Location: Michigan

Re: new the forum and first time boat builder

Post by Ed Phillips »

Well it finally got above 50 degrees in Michigan so I took this opportunity to paint the inside of my grandson's boat. I still need to varnish the underside of the floor boards and the boards under the seat before I can install them, and that's next.
I am only a few days away from working on the decking boards and my plan calls for bronze nails to be used for attaching them rather than screws. Not that I am against using nails but I can't help but wonder why the change in attaching hardware?
The plans call for all joints to be glued just like everywhere else, and the spacing of the nails are 2" and 3" about the same as the screws. I guess there may be a legitimate argument made that the deck isn't a structural member so therefore doesn't need the clamping force generated by the screws? I assume fairing will still be necessary with the nail heads so that doesn't appear to offer any advantage.

So fellow boat builders does anyone know why nails on the deck rather than screws?

Thanks
Ed
Attachments
Remi's boat painted inside.jpg

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