staining inside of hull

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etswaterride
Posts: 49
Joined: Tue Dec 11, 2012 12:36 pm
Location: Billings, MT

staining inside of hull

Post by etswaterride »

I am going to "finish" the inside of my hull and upon more research I have read more statements about "not encapsulating" as it may actually accelerate rot! If water finds a way inside the wood, say a crack in the outside finish (at least 10 coats marine varnish) of the outside of hull, the encapsulation will trap water in the wood producing rot.

My question is can a person finish with a weather protecting product such as Prolux "Rubol" and then creating a system to circulate air in the bilge compartment to help dry if and when water enters?

I would like a few opinions either way before I make a decision.
Thanks in advance!

TomB
Posts: 966
Joined: Wed Jan 18, 2017 4:07 pm
Location: Holland, MI

Re: staining inside of hull

Post by TomB »

Refinishing an old plank bottom boat that had to soak every season to keep the joints tight needs to breath. Encapsulating high moisture content traps moisture for rot. There's a lot written on the subject. Nobody talks about replacing rotted planks on the same boat. Nobody writes about all these guys making a living replacing planks. There have to be thirty of them in my zip code.

Two ways for moisture to get in, from the outside or inside. The beautiful Riviera you are building (just saw your build today) has a coat of epoxy between each layer of planking, and I assume, multiple coats of epoxy on the outside. So Mother Nature will have to work to find multiple cracks through multiple layers to soak the inside layer of your hull. A breathable inner layer won't let bottom side moisture it will only let moisture in. Stick with multiple coats of epoxy and touch up the nicks, bumps, screw holes, etc. to keep a dry hull.

Tom
In the home stretch on a Tahoe 23

Idigplanes
Posts: 22
Joined: Mon Sep 09, 2019 9:52 am
Location: Newburgh Indiana

Re: staining inside of hull

Post by Idigplanes »

Hows your Riviera build coming? i have just purchased a set of plans and not yet started. I"m still checking on everyone's tips and ideas on building. I'm having a difficult time finding materials also. Do you have a builder thread going? i can't seem to find it.

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etswaterride
Posts: 49
Joined: Tue Dec 11, 2012 12:36 pm
Location: Billings, MT

Re: staining inside of hull

Post by etswaterride »

http://www.glen-l.com/phpBB2/viewtopic.php?f=4&t=29404

I didn't do a blog of my build but if you copy the urrl above and paste it in the browser it will take you to my posts.
I have been at this for some years now because one year after I started I had a new priority come up that is taking me forever.....
Not going to lie, its all about money and time.
Anyway thanks for your interest.

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etswaterride
Posts: 49
Joined: Tue Dec 11, 2012 12:36 pm
Location: Billings, MT

Re: staining inside of hull

Post by etswaterride »

TomB wrote:
Sun Sep 22, 2019 8:17 am
Refinishing an old plank bottom boat that had to soak every season to keep the joints tight needs to breath. Encapsulating high moisture content traps moisture for rot. There's a lot written on the subject. Nobody talks about replacing rotted planks on the same boat. Nobody writes about all these guys making a living replacing planks. There have to be thirty of them in my zip code.

Two ways for moisture to get in, from the outside or inside. The beautiful Riviera you are building (just saw your build today) has a coat of epoxy between each layer of planking, and I assume, multiple coats of epoxy on the outside. So Mother Nature will have to work to find multiple cracks through multiple layers to soak the inside layer of your hull. A breathable inner layer won't let bottom side moisture it will only let moisture in. Stick with multiple coats of epoxy and touch up the nicks, bumps, screw holes, etc. to keep a dry hull.

Tom
Hi Tom,
Thanks for your reply,
That's exactly the response I was hoping and was always planning on using epoxy to finish the inside until I ran into the readings.
I gathered the readings were referring more to planked boats.
I thought there might be an exception to the cold mold as it is layered and each layer is therefor "encapsulated."
Anyway I want to tell you I tried to epoxy the outside "shear" of the boat but ended up with "curtains and sags" and a lot of disappointment....soooo
I just put about 20 coats of marine varnish which I believe netted me 10 to 12 coats due to the sanding.
The bottom of the hull has fiberglass and several coats of epoxy then the varnish.
My finish is pretty good as it does have have a mirror look to it but it could have been better!
So the sides are only varnish but I don't think that makes a difference to your advice?
Thanks again!!
Trent

TomB
Posts: 966
Joined: Wed Jan 18, 2017 4:07 pm
Location: Holland, MI

Re: staining inside of hull

Post by TomB »

Trent,

I had the same issues with sags on the side, look at it wet :D look at it cured :x . Rolling and tipping helped get very thin coats which took care of most of the sag issues. I still sanded a LOT. If you didn't sand the epoxy all the way to bare wood, you got the benefits. And 20 coats of varnish...I admire your perseverance.

Tom
In the home stretch on a Tahoe 23

Idigplanes
Posts: 22
Joined: Mon Sep 09, 2019 9:52 am
Location: Newburgh Indiana

Re: staining inside of hull

Post by Idigplanes »

Still new to all of this so some more newby questions. My Riviera plans call for some 1x9 lumber for the frames. Where the heck do you get that or is it acceptable to edge join lumber for this? also, the deck beams on the frames are attached with carriage bolts, do they also need to be epoxied? Thanks for any input.

hoodman
Posts: 2760
Joined: Thu Nov 10, 2011 8:48 am
Location: Lafayette, IN

Re: staining inside of hull

Post by hoodman »

Frame three on the Geronimo takes really wide lumber to make. I ended up edge glueing about an inch onto one board to make up the difference. If you're really concerned you can back the edge glued area with a plywood gusset but I didn't find that necessary.
Matt

Building a Geronimo......!
viewtopic.php?f=2&t=25139

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